Tuesday, March 27, 2012

March 27

JOURNAL TOPIC: [today's tunes: "Help Me" by Joni Mitchell; "With a Little Help From My Friends" by The Beatles/performed by Joe Cocker; "Help!" by The Beatles]

'Tis the season. Who's taking the AP exam? You? Your partner? Friends/neighbors? How can you help someone prepare and succeed? How can someone else help you? Visualize the morning of the AP exam: as you walk out of the test and smile the smile of a difficult job finished and well done, who will you be able to thank, and for what?

AGENDA:
1. Journal
2. Essays: peer editing & feedback

HW:
1. Congratulations to everyone on your scholarships and acceptances, and caveat emptor; read this article and comment to this post with your reactions.

70 comments:

  1. That's really scary to think about. I've talked about college with my parents a lot and the one thing that they keep telling me is that a college education is an investment in your future that no one can take away. People can take your house, your car, and all the money you've ever earned. But an education is yours no matter what. My parents have also told me that I won't need to take out any loans for college. They're going to pay for all of it just like their parents did for them. This way I don't have to not gwt the education I want just because of money.

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  2. I totally agree with Hannah! I too have also been talking to my parents about college a lot lately. If I do not receive grants/ scholarships I will have to take out many student loans. Yes, I am very scared about taking out the loans, but I know that once I graduate and start working I will be able to pay back the loans quickly.

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  3. When it comes to money, community college sounds better and better.

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  4. For all people in the world, money does matter. When it comes to college, sometimes it makes or breaks people. Even though it's scary to think about the consequences of loans, college is also costing in the experience. I've been lucky enough to know that my parents support whatever college I go to and will help me pay off the tuition. They agreed with what I said from the start of the whole college process: It's at least four years to live somewhere else where I'm not worried where my meals will be or where I'll be able to sleep. It's a chance to experience living alone because afterwards, you may have to come back and live with friends or your parents in order to pay everything back. Of course, like anyone, I'm not excited for debt and loans. But I want to invest in this next part of life and I'm okay with facing the financial consequences.

    -Kelly Brickey, Period 3

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  5. I feel cornered; I am not going to lie. I know that pretty much the stakes for getting out of college into a career and be relatively debt free have just jumped like crazy. It seems as if we are not at the top of our class or never experience a burnout from the minute we walk into high school to the end of our lives, we are essentially screwed. This seems impossible yet there has to be a way that you can love what you do without having the fear of monster debt or unemployment staring you down. Most people including myself have a vague idea what we want to do and for the most part are multi-talented, protégés aside. If I am not mistaken, the situation with college and this recession feels like bad relationship where everyone is hurting and wants to take as much as they can while giving up as little as they can themselves. I am now walking into college hoping that I can be as little burden to my parents until my brother comes in two years after me, and acquiring as many tools as I can before my time is up. There are a bunch of people that are waiting for me to mess up on my debt when I do acquire it and kick me when I’m down by adding the penalties. When I go to college, I will not be going after a degree. Instead I will be trying to learn as many skills as I can so that I may be unable to keep a stable single job at one place, but hopefully work at many places until someone sees the value I am adding to the table and want me full time and actually give me a decent check to pay things off. Hopefully I will be able to maintain the cash I need to pay off for my debt in this manner and that employers still value a strong work ethic over the amount of hours they pay me. The current situation isn’t working so it seriously is up to the class of 2012 and the classes afterwards to make a new one because our futures and personal happiness are at stake.

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  6. Like Chad and Hannah, I too have been talking that college talk with my dad. Maybe not as frequent as they do, but the college talk it still is. The loan situation just makes me worry, even for those close to me. Like what Trey said, I completely agree. My dad wants me to go to college, yes, but even he's saying that it's best to go through Hancock and then go from there. All he wants to see me achieve is a bachelor's degree in something relative to what I want to do in the future. Maybe its and ego thing with the four year schools or something, I don't know. I'm not bashing on those who got accepted there. Congrats, and I'm happy that my colleagues are getting what they want from life in terms of education.

    I don't want any loans for college. It's like procrastinating in this case. It feels good now, but you realize you're screwed when that time is gone.

    That's just my 2 cents, once again: Congrats to those who got accepted (^_^)d

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  7. I have always heard that if you want a good job you need to go to college and get an education. The idea of not going to college was risky. Now things seem to be changing. Going to college doesn't promise you a better paying job, it doesn't even promise you a job. Taking out student loans and going $30,000 in debt is the big risk now. Money is a huge issue these days.. especially with how the economy is. I think it's really sad that young kids with soo much potential are not getting the opportunity to go to college because they can't afford it.

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  8. My parents have always told me that college will be a great exprience especially if I want to succeed in life and get a better education. I have been worried though about how I am going to be able to afford college since the numbers for attending college just seem to get larger and larger. If I dont recieve any scholarships or grants I have thought about taking out loans and the possible outcomes of this. It scares me to have to be put in this position but I know that college is the right decision for me.

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  9. While taking out loans is a daunting task, especially since we are so young, I feel that it's a necessary evil. I understand my peers who want to lessen this debt by going to a community college first, but I feel that a four year college is the next step for me. It's a difficult undertaking to find a company that is willing to hire someone who didn't get some kind of college degree. There are of course, the exceptions to the rule, but just how many exceptions are there? We can't all be one. That path just seems too risky for my liking and fortunately I know that with the field that I am going into that I'll be able to pay back my loans within a couple years. My parents wish they could provide assistance for all my four years of college, I have an older sister in college right now and a younger one who's college years will overlap with mine. Such hardships though will pay off in the long run.

    I sympathize with students who can't go to college due to finical problems. Instead of going to college to continue their education and maybe create new jobs to stimulate the economy, they have to stay back at home, without a college degree/experience and are most likely unemployed.

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  10. This article made me second think my decision about going straight to a 4-year. There are a lot of risks involved with it, the biggest being the money issue. I can potentially be getting myself into a lot of debt. But after thinking about this article for a while I realized that a college education is worth the risk. Not everything always has to be about money an education will be well worth it for me. My parents cannot afford to pay for my college education and so a lot of it will probably be loans. But I figured that an education will be something that will be with me forever, an investment in my future. I also began to think that if the government wants more people to graduate from a university and receive degrees they should do more to encourage people. Not only should they set goals for us but they should also give out more opportunities. They should help those who just graduated from college and do not have a job with their debt instead of making them pay it. There’s so much that the government can do for us that will make a great difference with us students.

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  11. Yes college may cost a lot of money, but I know it will be worth it in the long run. I have never questioned going straight to a four-year university; enrolling at a community college just doesn't seem right for me. Reading this article made me more nervous about my future, but it didn't change my plans. The top schools that I want to go to all cost over $50,000 per year, an extremely large sum of money. Although I still plan on going straight to a university, I do feel more inclined now to go to the school that offers me the most scholarships.

    Arianna Farmer
    Period 2

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  12. Suggestion: treat the article as an expository piece, not a persuasive one. The idea behind sharing this information isn't to scare you or make you change your mind; it's simply to make you aware of the issues so you can get the best bang for your (family's) buck & plan ahead.

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  13. For me, this topic has popped up many times as I have talked about it with my family, other relatives, teachers, and college friends. Most of us are destined to go to college. But the main question is “How are we going to pay for it?” And for me, I am carefully and eagerly considering ALL possible solutions (such as scholarships, grants, community colleges, savings, etc.) before resulting to loans as a last resource. If I do end up borrowing loans, my goal is to keep the cost as low to zero; so therefore, I won’t have to worry about a hugeee amount to pay back later. I also personally know college students who have struggled with this same issue. The more loans a person tends to take, the more and harder it is to pay it all back in the future-especially the way our economy has been. I do sympathize for these people and the young girl in this article. To us, something may seem right and essential now. But if we don’t focus on the long-term affect, it could be something that might hinder us later on. That’s why I feel it’s better to plan for future comings now by considering all possible outcomes/solutions that could arrive later.

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  14. *whiiiiiistle* .....that'll burn a hole in your wallet.

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  15. For me personally, I don't like owing anybody anything. Be it money or otherwise. Sooooo the idea of a loan I WILL more than likely struggle to pay back doesn't quite sit right with me. (I like my knee caps)

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  16. The money issue associated with going to a univercity is why I am going to community college first. Not going to college has never been an option in my mind or my parents' but community college first will soften the blow to my parents pockets. The field I plan on going into requires a degree and I know I will be able to eventually pay off all debts associated with that degree but it's still frightening to think about.

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  17. I found this article to be very interesting because it focuses on our senior class. It opens my eyes to what the consequences can be by taking out loans. Having the opportunity to attend a 4-year University adds to my determination to apply for scholarships. My biggest goal this year is acquiring enough scholarships so my parents can have some breathing room when helping me pay for college.

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  18. I don't think this should be new news to anyone, being in debt after college is the reality unless your very wealthy. And people can get into trouble with loans of any kind, not just college, interest is something that's better to overlook. And if everyone has the same degrees there will be no demand for that amount of graduates, so getting work will be near impossible, so variety and understanding the realities of our society seem to be ever relevant.

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  19. In all honesty, I’m already a little bit stressed about which school to go to, and this article made my decision a little easier to make. Going to college and receiving a greater education is worth the risk of getting into debt, but will it back fire on me? I have always had my mind set on going straight into a 4-year university, but if that means getting myself into debt and possibly putting my children’s educational future at risk, in the sense that I won’t have any money to pay for their college, then I don’t want to follow along with my plans. People always say that money isn’t an issue when it comes to a greater education because there is money everywhere, but in reality, we have to pay most of it back. I am now planning on going to a state school because it to provides me with the same educational opportunities and is cheaper. The only down side is that it doesn’t have the “UC” title.
    Lupe Perez

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  20. Seems like the "oh, I'll just take a student loan, get a job and repay quickly" is just a dream. Face it. It's not that simple. I know few adults who are still paying back their loans. Student loans and debts are like ghosts--they'll haunt you (maybe not so much "haunt"), you can't shrug and declare bankruptcy; it doesn't work that way.

    Like what Drew said, the article shouldn't be new to anyone. If it is new, they're probably living under a rock (or is extremely wealthy).

    Go to college or not, life's a game. Play it your way.

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  21. I agree with Drew, most college students do come out of college with some sort of debt. It is an issue that most incoming college students should address with their families, so they know what they are getting themselves into when taking a loan. Community college is great for some people, but everyone is different and some may prefer going straight to a four year university. College may be expensive, but it is worth it down the road when you are settling into your career, regardless of how you decide to pay for it.

    Hunter Walker
    Period 3

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  22. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  23. It's so unfortunate you're wanting to go to a four year university, and you're not rich, you're going to have to take out student loans. I know I there's scholarships and such but even this is not nearly enough to help me pay for a college education. This has been such a daunting thought in my head lately. I know I'm going to have to take out loans, therefore causing me to be in a fairly substantial amount of debt after college. And the thing that makes it all so much harder to swallow is the fact that, this day in age, a college degree doesn't guarantee a good job, if any. I also don't want my parents to have this weight on their shoulders, so I plan on paying back as much of these loans as I can. So I sit here with my stomach churning thinking about the debt I'm going to be in, and I know you have a good amount of time to repay the college loans, but if going to college doesn't assist me in getting a good job or any, then an infinite amount of time won't be enough for me to pay for my college education.
    -Kelli Carrillo

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  24. I agree that this isn't news, and any one of us can say that we knew we'd come out of college with some debt at the end. Is it unfortunate and unfair? Sure. But, that's the way of the world. Everyone has their dues in life to pay before they can really start living, it seems. It sucks, but it shouldn't discourage anyone from doing what they want, either. We know what we're getting into, so it's our jobs to be responsible, practical, and smart when it comes to our borrowing and spending habits. Live on ramen and cereal, forgo the David Spade concert (or whatever it may be), and finish school as quickly as possible so you're not racking up any unnecessary debt. It seems simple enough to me to just grin and bear it for a while.

    -Marissa Tajalle
    P.2

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  25. This article explains the reason why i chose not to go to a four year right away in the first place, its true your education is something that no one can take away, but being in debt is something i will never want to deal with and the way things are this day in age, going to a four year is not cheap. I didn't want to put my family into that position where they have to cut back on benefits they can have in their lives for my own, and paying for college while your in college is not easy. I never want the word bankrupt to be a part of my life so i chose early that a community college for a couple of years knocking out my G.E for much cheaper and accumulating money for whatever college i choose to transfer was a smarter choice for me personally to make. Like my peers are saying going to a four year does not promise a high paying job, my cousin has a masters in computer technology but he works currently as a tractor driver. The article was not new to me at all in fact i knew almost everything in it freshman year. Our economy isn't improving and looking for ways to conserve and build up your money is always better than being in debt. I am not saying don't go to college and get a great education, i am suggesting that people who are going to be smart with your money because you dont want those years of education to be for nothing.

    -Jacob Vargas
    period 4

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  26. The article brings light to things I already knew. Although reading the statistics is a bit shocking, everyone is a little surprised when they look at the price of an education these days. These are things my parents and I were both well aware of when I was applying to colleges. My sister just graduated from Cal Poly SLO and me and my brother are both entering next year so they have informed themselves very well on what the best payment path to take it. Also, they planned a head and both of us have been putting money into my college fund for as long as I can remember. I am fortunate enough to have them pay for my education but will be getting a job as soon as I can so they do not have to support everything I need.

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  27. My whole life I've known that I'm extremely lucky. My amazing parents already have a college fund ready for me. Reading this article just made me remember how lucky I am. It's shocking how expensive school is, even if you finish your general education at a junior college first, it's still really expensive... I mean, I feel like I already knew this information, not the details, but in general.

    -Cody Kiniry
    Period 4.

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  28. This article made me realize once again how priveledged and blessed I am that my college education is completely payed for by my athletic scholarship. I have worked very hard my whole life to reach this goal and now that I have it only makes me want to work harder.

    Mariah cooks p.2

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  29. It disturbs me to think I can spend the days studying in school for a degree, graduate with a large sum of debt, and due to the recessive economy, not have a job fitting to my degree. I still hope to go to a state school for the next four years and transfer to a UC, but this article stressed me out.
    D

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  30. There's not much I can say that hasn't already been said, but I am very thankful to have my college paid for by my parents. This article was nothing new to me although the stats were scary. I know college is extremely expensive and I'm grateful to have parents that are willing and capable to pay for me. It's a benefit that many don't have.

    Nathan Seidenberg
    P. 3

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  31. I feel like this is such an intense topic for everyone in the class of 2012. When I applied for colleges I applied for the colleges best for me not thinking about the cost of the college. It's funny how we all apply to these places not knowing the cost of these colleges when thats one of the most important factor. I feel that the high prices of colleges takes kids away from what college is best for them and they can't afford the true college they want. The society we live in forces us to go to college then the second we get out of colleges we are all broke because of the immense loans we have to pay off to get the education we need. And then our parents have to use so much of their money I pay for colleges.
    Max kuhlman
    Period 2

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  32. Like many have said, it does feel scary to take out loans.If anything, I don't feel that this article scared me but made me more aware and motivated. As the article said, "Students need to make smarter choices." It is important to consider what schools will be the least expensive, how you'll contribute to paying loans. etc.

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  33. This article made me feel thankful to my parents once again who are paying for my college. Also I am somewhat glad that I have chosen to go to get my General Education finished at Hancock and transfer to CSU's or UC's. I am so glad my parents are willing to support/pay for my tuition.

    YunJoo Lee
    P.6

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  34. This article only enforced my decision to go to Hancock and transfer to a university. For my career choice I can study whatever I want, as long as I take a certain set of classes along with the ones involved with the major I choose. So, I figured I would study whatever actually interested me, and I would find out exactly what that is at Hancock. The article made me decided that it was the right thing to do in order to help my parents save money. I will graduate from a four year, but I'll end up saving my parents a lot of money by going to Hancock to get my general education done first.

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  35. After reading the article I sat and thought about what it said. Although I already knew about the expenses and price of college I hadn't really seen it in this light with all of the personal accounts and examples from real people. Two things came to mind while thinking. One, thank God I'm not going to a private school. Two, I need to get my "poop in a group" and start filling out more scholarship applications.

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  36. Going directly to a four-year will definitely bring expenses and a community college may seem a lot less expensive but I know I am ready to take on a four-year and paying for college will be part of the experience, a BIG part. I know what I want to do with my life and I am not going to let money get in the way because I know there is always a way,especially if you are driven to go deeper into that thing you have a passion for. It makes all those struggles definitely worthwhile.

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  37. Well... that's what you get for majoring in something like English in college.

    Paul Hurd

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  38. Daniel Gonzalez Per.2March 27, 2012 at 11:08 PM

    I have the choice to go to a 4 year college but i'm most likely moving to LA and going to a community college there, then transferring to a better school because its less expensive. My older sister's grace period is almost over and like all 2011 graduates she is struggling to prepare for those payments. I talk to her a lot about college as well as my other older sister and they agree with my plan to start at a community college. In the end its not about where you got your degree its what you do with it.

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  39. Debt isn't that bad if you choose to just go to a state school. I think this helped me to decide where I want to go to school. Private institutions aren't viable. But, I should try and choose a major that actually has a job market rather than something I'm interested in.

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  40. As nice as it would be if money wasn't an issue, that isn't going to happen. Money has to be part of the situation when deciding where to go to college. College is extremely expensive but I believe it's worth it. I have not talked to one person who regrets going to college. I think moving out and being on your own is a necessary step. I agree with what the article said about choosing majors with large job fields. A lot of people choose a major without really thinking about where it will get them.

    Candace Rickman, period 3

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  41. I think this article means something different to each person reading it. For some people unfortunately the money does matter and play a very big factor into what college they will attend. I think it's important to see this as an informative article and not a pursuasive one. It's not saying you should automatically choose a community college over a 4 year. It's just allowing you to consider the other side and the 'what if' factor. It definitely made me start to think about my future and how I will be managing my time and money during these next 4 years.

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  42. These examples and facts are why I decided to start off at a community college. Although I might prefer to go straight to a four year university, I know I will thank myself later. This article taught me some things I hadn't thought about. For example, taking out too many student loans than you can manage can damage your credit score if you can't make the payments, which can then affect your ability to buy a house or a car. It's sad to think people with degrees they worked so hard for can't find a job. Our society has told us having a college education is the only way to ensure a stable income, but even that isn't enough anymore.

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  43. After reading this article it really made me realize and start thinking about expenses. Before I would think "oh there's financial aid that can help," but now thinking about it and reading about the different experience other people had, it has opened my eyes to see that there's a lot more to it. Now that I think about it and as the day comes closer in going to that four year university, I think of how I need to start applying for loans and other things that will benefit me. Even though I may get all the help I need with loans and financial aid, it still frightens me a bit that I may not be able to pay everything I need to off and end up with a life of constant debt.

    -Jessica Manriquez; Per. 6

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  44. This article supplies a lot of valuable information for students entering college next year. I felt that the author had a great point that this article is not targeting every student, but mainly those with majors that don't have a wide career base (i.e. History or English). If you are going to spend thousands of dollars on an education, you should be confident that the education you are paying for will get you a decent career. Lastly, if a school is too expensive, and fafsa/scholarships aren't giving you enough money to attend, you shouldn't risk being in debt. It's not bad to take out some student loans, but as the article states, I wouldn't want more than $35,000 after four years.

    Alex McKinney

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  45. This article helped me realize how important it is to consider the economic aspects when choosing which college I will attend. I have been told not to let money be the deciding factor for college, but in the current economy you can't ignore this. I was glad to hear that math and science majors are in high demand, since this is the route I will be taking.

    Patrick Fraire

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  46. :| Depending on the use of the degrees and how the classes are taught, college can feel like a scam.

    Dannielle Edwards

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  47. Wow. I didn't realize the severity of college debt. The numbers and percentages are huge. This puts a lot of pressure on us to do our research and make wise decisions for college because it is an "investment" and can affect us the rest of our lives.

    Kayla McCallie
    Period 2

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  48. This article freaked me out a bit. We are still kids and we don't like to think about money, debt, or bills (not that anyone does). The article gave me reassurance that my choiuce to do AFROTC in college is good because they will pay for my tuition.

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  49. This article scared me as well. It seems like all I talk about with my parents is College and trying to get scholarships. My plan for this is to get as many as I can and get loans for the rest.

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  50. Yikes! This article really makes you think... It brought me back to not only our recent Socratic seminars, but to our Uncollege talk with Dale Stephens back in January. I'm not even planning on attending a four year university, but this still makes me thing. Brings me back to what Dale said, about our generation needing to find creative ways to get where we want to be in life...


    Jessica Catron 4th period

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  51. This article gives a thought of food for thought, you have to know what you're doing when it comes to college. Because it's not like high school, for once we are taking the reins on our education and that means paying for it as well. Your major is extremely important because in the long run you have to know that you'll be able to survive on it, that it's going to take you where you need to go. And financially, you have to go to a college that suits you. For me, it's not as important because where I plan to go isn't a big hassle with money but in the future this will be valuable information.

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  52. This article is a real wake up call for my sel and I'm sure others as well. College is something that you need to take seriously because the decisions that you make while you are there can affect the rest of your life. I think the most important thing to be aware of is how expensive college really is. I hate watching kids think they know it all and they end up getting themselves or their parents into mojor debt because they didn't take care of business when they needed to. School puts many people into debts that they will have to pay for the rest of their life. My dad stresses the point of graduating in four years all the time because 1 year of college at the school I'm going to costs 44,000 a year and it's only increasing. Also I am paying for 20,000 of that so it is in my best interest to get what I need done as fast as I can and to not screw around. It's still ok to have fun though, that's for sure

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  53. The thought of being in incredible amounts of debt makes me feel a sense of relief knowing that I'm going to a community college. Drew said that with an incredible abundance in a certain field creates a lack of necessity for that certain field. With that said, saving time and money at a junior college seems actually not as bad as I expected.
    Noe Bernal
    Period 2

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  54. Even though this doesn't apply to me it makes me wonder how much debt all these college kids are starting their lives with. It is sad to think that they are handicapped right out of college and basically screwed if they don't get a job right at the get go.

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  55. This is a pretty scary scenario, even though it doesn't directly affect me. It might in the future and that's what is scary. A lot of these kids will not be able to pay these debts off for years to come. Something should change in this whole situation.

    Tyler Stewart Period 3

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  56. It is interesting that within the last few weeks, I have had several "wake up calls" about money and college. It encouraged me to work really hard to get more scholarships and begin saving my money. I want to be financially savvy at a young age so I do not have to be enslaved by debt or insecurity. My heart goes out to those who have thousands of dollars of mounting debt and it definitely wakes me up to begin learning about money.
    Rebecca Patterson period 6

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  57. It's a major buzzkill knowing that once I get out of college I'll have a huge debt. Makes you seriously reconsider if college is the right path to take.

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  58. Everyone may say education is essential yet for most people it's a struggle just to attend because affording it is holding them back. This is a main reason why I chose to go to community college first before transferring to a university so I could I least reduce my debt after I graduate.I've read about similar articles like this & have watched news documentaries, & its a harsh reality but for ME I want an education & will get it no matter what the cost no pun intended. It is very unfortunate that all these college grads aren't getting jobs even with their proper education. Both my parents have also talked this situation before with me & they agree that even if I will be in debt after I graduate, I need the education, they want me to succeed & to not let student loans keep me away from it.

    Alaysia Navarro
    Period 4

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  59. This article is intimidating. I'll definitely have to take some time to consider ways to pay for the rest of my schooling.

    Matthew Giddings p.3

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  60. The thought of this really does scare me. Money has been a problem or my family my whole life and I wanted to go to college so I wouldn't suffer the same kind of issues with my family in the future. With this article read I now see I can still be in this same pickle even after such hard earned education. Student debt is ridiculous and scary, I'm truly hoping for as much support from extended family so I won't end up graduating college and being so broke I can't do anything with my success.

    Shannon Murray
    Period 3

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  61. I think this article makes you think twice about college. You can go to college, but by the time you get out, you can possibly be in debt. Earlier in the year, the price of college didn't hit me. Recently, as acceptance letters started to come in, I thought about the prices of college and had to think if I really wanted to go to that school. When you're in a four year college, you can't mess around because that might be another year, and more money to spend.

    Chelsey Soriano p.3

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  62. While this article brings up some very good points and makes you think about your future, it doesn't really worry me. I am so blessed to have Parents who have been saving for my college education since the day I wad born. I have also put away close to a full year of tuition from raising and selling animals at the fair. I have also worked my butt off to get scholarships and be part of the Honors program at Colorado State which also helps with tuition. I feel like if you and your parents plan for your educational future, you can minimize the amount of debt you will have when you get out of college. Also, if you're already in debt when you get out of college, make plans to spend as little as possible. There's no sense in buying/renting a house right out of college if your parents have an extra room or you have a relative to stay with so you can save money and pay off your debts before you completely go out on your own. Realistically, everyone is going to end up with some college debt, but if you manage your finances correctly, those debts will just be another payment you have to make, not something that will drive you into poverty.

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  63. Lately, everyone is stressing out about college. Deadlines, paperwork, and of course funding. College is extremely expensive but there are other ways to get funding instead of taking out a loan and being in debt for 30+years. If you are focused, determined and willing to take the time, you can pay for schooling with scholarships. There and tons of them out there you just have to be willing to look. Funding shouldnt be a determining factor on the type of education we receive. With hard work and determination, you can pay for your college and have a great experience without the debt.
    Tori Thompson Period 3

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  64. I always knew that college was going to be expensive, this article just reinforces that fact. It gives me a small piece of mind, knowing that I am going to go to Hancock and save some money. The article also gives you more motivation to fill out and get scholarships to help pay.

    Mitchell Edmondson
    Period 4

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  65. As a senior in high school, I've been thinking a lot lately which school I should attend. Many factors affect my decision such as my reputation and expecially FINANCIAL AID. In the past, I thought to my self that I would prefer to go to college A over college B just because college A was well known. However, after reading the 5-page article on money problems students face for college, my decision changed. Sure people say that students can get loans, and pay them off when they get jobs, but that DREAM is a pain in the @$$ to fulfill. I'm leaning towards this concept: It doesn't matter which school I go to for undergrad as long as I strive for the best there and go to a good graduate school. Even though some people might say things like "Why did that student go to that school? I thought he/she was smart? Guess not. It can get stressful when people judge others for which school they're going to attend, but don't worry, you just made the wisest decision you'll never regret. This sounds mean but say 10 years from now on, contact people you knew that went to colleges just for the name and ask "So who made the right decision?"

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  66. Money has definitely influenced my future plans. I was accepted to an Institute of great opportunity, but for financial reasons I'm unfortunately unable to attend. With my brother in college i see directly how finances affect college students. However i know that there are ways to succed but the opportunities are dwindling. I want to try my best to get a higher education, and i will try my best to achieve that goal.

    Ryan McGinley
    per. 6

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  67. When i read this article i'll admit i got scared. My parents and I have talked many times about college and paying for it. If I dont get any scholarship money, it will be hard to pay all of the tuition. Especially since I will be out of state.

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  68. Money influences your life immensely, whether it be for college or shopping at a random retail store. Money is one of the dominant thing that influences our decisions and it has definitely influenced mine and the choice I will have to make between a Junior College and University. This article has really pushed me to fill out as many scholarship possible to have the best opportunity, wherever I decide to continue my schooling.

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  69. To be honest, everybody knew that money was going to be a noose around their neck when it came to paying for college. It is bound to get tighter but there are ways to loosen the noose. Scholarships can only help out so much but with that little boost you can find more ways to pay off tuitions. Nothing in life is free, let alone if it's to better yourself so the best you can do is seek out opportunities rather than shunning them.

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