Friday, September 9, 2011

The Persistence of Writing

ASSIGNMENT:
In light of yesterday's Socratic seminar, your own experience and the following article, please answer the following questions in comments to this post (if you encounter difficulty in commenting please bring a hard copy to class on Monday, 9/12). Feel free to engage each other with questions and responses; I will chime in as well.

1. What is Burkdall's thesis?
2. Given that students in our classes seem to be divided about e-readers (see comments here), why do you think the media so eagerly concludes that reading books is dead and young people all want new tech (with chips) instead of old tech (with pages)?
3. Explain the allusion to Ulysses.
4. What reasons does the article provide for the importance of reading? Do you agree? Why/why not?
5. How do you think this moment in history will be remembered? Will technological advances continue to support intellectual development, as it did with writing and the transition from scroll to codex, or is our reliance on tools encouraging us to relax our brains to the point of atrophy? Explain your answer.


[NOTE: You can read the article in its original online format--in which the footnotes are properly formatted and easier to follow-- here.]

The Persistence of Writing

© 2009 Thomas Burkdall.

EDUCAUSE Review, vol. 44, no. 3 (May/June 2009): 58–59

THOMAS BURKDALL

Thomas Burkdall (tlburk@oxy.edu) is an Associate Professor in English Writing and the Director of the Center for Academic Excellence at Occidental College in Los Angeles.

An intellectual apocalypse may be looming: Caleb Crain informs us that the "Twilight of the Books" is upon us, whereas Steve Jobs tells us that the concept of Amazon's Kindle is "flawed at the top because people don't read anymore."1 At the Conference on College Composition and Communication in March 2009, workshops focused on how to assess multimodal assignments, rather than the traditional essay. And the Modern Language Association annual convention in December 2008 opened with a panel on multimedia. Is reading dead? Is the teaching of writing becoming a more difficult exercise because of these mounting cultural pressures against reading and writing? It appears that we might as well "stop the sea" (as Leopold Bloom muses in Ulysses) as take up arms against the onslaught of multimedia.

But instead of relying on the predictive power of the Magic 8-Ball to respond "Outlook not so good" for writing, perhaps we should choose "Ask again later" as a better response. Nancy Bunge has noted: "Students realize that if they do not grapple with difficult, abstract texts, they will miss an important dimension of human learning and thinking."2 Does this comment represent the last gasp of a moribund print culture? Is it the desperate hope of one whose livelihood may be going the way of the farrier? Nay, let me borrow from Mark Twain: the reports of the death of writing are greatly exaggerated.

Let me also be clear: I am not against teaching with multimedia, and on many occasions I require my students to create a number of such artifacts. But let us not discard print completely in favor of audio, visual, and/or audiovisual creations. As Jonathan Swift suggested centuries ago in his novel Gulliver's Travels (1726), a concrete language is not enough. At the Academy of Lagado, Gulliver observes scholars carrying bags of objects to avoid the ambiguity of words, yet for abstract thought and expression, humans need the suppleness of meaning that only words afford. And we need certain conditions to appreciate or create such subtleties. As Crain suggests, some learning requires solitary reading. He quotes Marcel Proust that to read is "to receive a communication with another way of thinking, all the while remaining alone, that is, while continuing to enjoy the intellectual power that one has in solitude and that conversation dissipates immediately."3 Writing, I would argue, further enhances learning, since written communication demands a set of conditions and intellectual skills different from those needed for speech or multimedia texts.

Even if multimedia expression will eventually dominate our intellectual discourse—as it, arguably, has now come to dominate our popular communication—the written word and its systems will continue to have an influence on us. For although writing arose millennia ago, and movable type has been around since at least the fifteenth century, and inexpensive books have been common for most of the last 150 years, we still rely on rhetorical elements that have roots in the Classical world. Even if we reduce the longevity—in something analogous to Moore's law—writing will not vanish for decades. It will have direct and ancillary benefits, albeit in a multimodal universe.

Why does reading still matter? In the twenty-first century, the contemplative and distinctly unimodal Proust has assumed a leading role in defenses of reading and in laments about its possible demise. Both Crain and Bunge cite his introduction to a 1906 translation of John Ruskin's Sesame and Lilies; they were led to it, in all likelihood, by Maryanne Wolf's Proust and the Squid: The Story and Science of the Reading Brain.4 They extract pithy remarks from Proust's remembrance of books read, later published as On Reading, such as: "I believe that reading, in its original essence, . . . [is] that fertile miracle of a communication effected in solitude."5 Reading allows both contemplation and discourse, offering isolation and community. More important, reading and writing have altered us and continue so to do. Walter Ong maintains: "Without writing, the literate mind would not and could not think as it does. . . . More than any other single invention, writing has transformed human consciousness."6 Or, like Jack Goody, one may regard writing to be "a technology of the intellect."7 The human race would be in a very different state of development without the invention and techniques of the written word. And a very precise tool writing can be. Ong argues: "Written words sharpen analysis, for the individual words are called on to do more. To make yourself clear without gesture, without facial expression, without intonation, without a real hearer, you have to foresee circumspectly all possible meanings a statement may have for any possible reader in any possible situation, and you have to make your language work so as to come clear all by itself."8 Are we ready to abandon entirely this extraordinary tool that encourages such attempts at accuracy?

Certainly, reading can be the conversation across time envisioned by many, including RenĂ© Descartes, John Ruskin, and Kenneth Burke, but John Sturrock, in his preface to On Reading, points out that Proust is a particular type of reader: a writer—in many ways, the type of writer we want students to become, for "reading should be an 'incitement,' a unique means of prompting the reader to, in the strongest sense of the phrase, 'think for himself.' The Proustian reader is made more, not less alert to the activity of his own mind by reading."9 Ideally, we hope students will join these conversations and engage in the critical thinking that both reading and writing nurture. Neither reading nor writing should be practiced only by the elite—with the former becoming "an increasingly arcane hobby" as some sociologists predict, according to Crain10—unless we wish to cede our responsibilities in a democratic society. Furthermore, having students write substantive prose requires them to live with the writing of others for a while (granted, often not as long as we might fervently hope). Thus, writing should continue to be taught in colleges and universities for both intellectual and political reasons.

But what if this battle is lost, and no one is asked to read and write anymore? Should we then padlock all the English departments in all the colleges and universities in all the world? Perhaps, but don't put the rhetoricians behind bars, for they have much to offer the multimodal students, since the five canons or precepts of rhetoric—invention, arrangement, style, delivery, and memory—still apply. Just as writers (and writing teachers) have adapted these principles from oral to written expression, so might we consider how they function in a multimodal world. Invention, arrangement, and style easily make the transition to multimedia. Discovering what to say, how to put the pieces together, and how to present them transfers readily to multimedia work. With delivery, the means to persuade moves from tone of voice to choosing audio or audiovisual presentation and effects. How one may best convince an audience expands dramatically as our capabilities to make audible and visible arguments are enhanced by technology. Memory, on the other hand, may no longer have the importance it once did, since extended oration more often than not necessitates a teleprompter. Certainly memory preoccupies us in terms of kilobytes on a computer disk drive. Perhaps, more significantly, memory may be regarded in terms of what it evokes. In our post-modern, mashup, remix culture, few produced texts—in any form—avoid becoming a bricolage of memories and meanings. Mikhail Bakhtin's heteroglossia, the polyphonous text, can exist on many levels in an audio essay or in a multimedia narrative. Adding a song, using a particular tone of voice, or applying a special effect may all communicate a message simultaneously.

Of course, even without resurrecting the spirits of Aristotle and Cicero, writing has a place in teaching forms of new media. Few of us can make a compelling point in an audio essay or create a voice-over for a short film without first generating a script. Having students create both written and multimedia texts allows them to contrast the effects of their words in a variety of situations. They begin to understand register, diction, and transitions in a new way when they deploy these techniques in different types of media. Multimodal expression should encourage the use of a variety of abilities.

Rather than banishing writing or lamenting the development of multimedia, as Socrates famously deplored the introduction of writing, let us teach both writing and multimedia. Each has distinct purposes and effects that students will discover as they explore their expressive and analytic potential. In her conclusion to Proust and the Squid, Wolf argues for such a "both/and" approach: "The analytical, inferential, perspective-taking, reading brain with all its capacity for human consciousness, and the nimble, multifunctional, multimodal, information-integrative capacities of a digital mind-set do not need to inhabit exclusive realms. Many of our children learn to code-switch between two or more oral languages, and we can teach them also to switch between different presentations of written language and different modes of analysis."11 Let us lead—an etymological root of educate—students to such richness of expression.

Notes
Caleb Crain, "Twilight of the Books: What Will Life Be Like If People Stop Reading?" New Yorker, December 24, 2007, ; Jobs quoted in John Markoff, "The Passion of Steve Jobs," New York Times, January 15, 2008, .
Nancy Bunge, "Assign Books, and Students Will Read," Chronicle of Higher Education, October 17, 2008, p. 24.
Crain, "Twilight of the Books."
Maryanne Wolf, Proust and the Squid: The Story and Science of the Reading Brain (New York: HarperCollins, 2007).
Marcel Proust, On Reading, preface and translation by John Sturrock (London: Penguin, 1994), p. 27.
Walter J. Ong, Orality and Literacy: The Technologizing of the Word (London: Methuen, 1982), p. 78.
Jack Goody, The Power of the Written Tradition (Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press, 2000), p. 133.
Ong, Orality and Literacy, p. 104.
Sturrock, preface to Proust, On Reading, p. vii.
Crain, "Twilight of the Books."
Wolf, Proust and the Squid, pp. 228–29.

78 comments:

  1. 1. “Let me also be clear: I am not against teaching with multimedia, and on many occasions I require my students to create a number of such artifacts. But let us not discard print completely in favor of audio, visual, and/or audiovisual creations. As Jonathan Swift suggested centuries ago in his novel Gulliver's Travels (1726), a concrete language is not enough. At the Academy of Lagado, Gulliver observes scholars carrying bags of objects to avoid the ambiguity of words, yet for abstract thought and expression, humans need the suppleness of meaning that only words afford. And we need certain conditions to appreciate or create such subtleties.”
    2. I think the media concluded that because more young people than ever are engaging in “new tech”. Our class must be a minority in the global standing of this argument.
    3. It means that if media is taking over reading and writing, then it is best to stop media before it can destroy reading and writing.
    4. The article says that the importance of reading is that it has sharpened the analytical part of our brain, and is a great tool for effective communication.
    5. I believe this moment in history will be known for its technological boom. Yes technological advances will support intellectual development because this new technology is also a new frontier. With it, brings new things to discover and invent. We can use it as a tool to learn more and better ways to do old tasks.

    Rebecca Pattterson. per.6

    ReplyDelete
  2. 1) “Let me also be clear: I am not against teaching with multimedia, and on many occasions I require my students to create a number of such artifacts. But let us not discard print completely in favor of audio, visual, and/or audiovisual creations. As Jonathan Swift suggested centuries ago in his novel Gulliver's Travels (1726), a concrete language is not enough. At the Academy of Lagado, Gulliver observes scholars carrying bags of objects to avoid the ambiguity of words, yet for abstract thought and expression, humans need the suppleness of meaning that only words afford. And we need certain conditions to appreciate or create such subtleties.”
    2) I believe this was concluded because most kids these days have become very lazy and would rather have a computer flip a page for them instead of actually doing it.
    3) It means that if media is taking over reading and writing, then we should stop reading and writing before it can be taken over by the media.
    4) The article is telling us is that is important to read because it keeps our brains sharp and alert, and I do agree with this because I believe that reading is very important.
    5) I believe this moment in history will be remember as the time where we decided technology is more efficient than reading an actual book. Technological advances will support intellectual development because this technology will bring us into a new era. We can use this to learn how to make our older and more complicated ways of life more efficient.
    Chad Foster
    Per.2

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  3. 1. Thomas Burkdall's thesis reads that, "It appears that we might as well "stop the sea" as take up arms against the onslaught of multimedia."
    2. The media follows that young people in general want the latest technology that they think is "cool", and that books are old fashioned. The media wants us to buy new things.
    3. He references Ulysses's quote "stop the sea" to compare it to the likelihood of the cessation of technological advancement in multimedia.
    4. Yes i agree stongly that reading is important. The article provides many points of support for of the importance of reading. I agree most strongly with Walter Ong that through writing we are forced to learn to communicate clearly.
    5. I believe that this moment in history is a new beginning for society. This age will be known for the start of a technological explosion.

    P.S. Never let us forget this day 9/11/01

    Patrick Sims P.3

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  4. 1. Burkdall’s thesis is that we can learn with both multimedia and writing by teaching students to switch from the different styles just as you are taught to code-switch between multiple languages.
    2. They come to this conclusion by seeing how students react to “ New” people in general are always trying to get the next best thing which is why it is to no big surprise that the media believes reading is dead and that all young people want is the “new” technology instead of the “old” technology in books.
    3. The destruction of reading and writing needs to be stopped and it should be done by stopping the advancements in multimedia.
    4. The article tells us that it is a different way of thinking and that some things to be understood must be solitarily read; this statement is 100% true. How would we gain knowledge about history or anything for that matter without reading? Sure you can listen to the audiobook but it doesn’t have the same effect as sitting down and digging your nose into the book so you know what really happened because sure you hear the recording but is it really registering; most likely not.
    5. This moment in history will most likely be remembered as the time when people began to stride toward a better understanding. Technology helps just that much more in gaining knowledge. I use it all the time to help gain a better understanding in some things especially when I’m at that point where I have no idea what’s going on, I type whatever it is I need to know into Google to find examples and info or whatever it is that’s going to help me understand what I need to know. I am just one person and I can’t speak for the world on this issue because I am just 1 of the many people on this planet but I do think that if we keep the mindset to keep on going forward technology can help us do great things.
    Isaac De La Cruz
    Period 2
    9/11/2011

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  5. Great ideas so far! However much I might agree with Patrick's P.S., let's all keep our comments focused on the assignment. Thanks everyone-- I look forward to reading (lots) more. See you tomorrow.

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  6. Sooooooo, does this mean I can't tell you guys about my day? :(

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  7. 1. “Rather than banishing writing or lamenting the development of multimedia, as Socrates famously deplored the introduction of writing, let us teach both writing and multimedia.” Burkdall’s thesis is basically telling us that we do not need to choose between tradition and technology; we need to cull both.
    2. The media so eagerly concludes that reading books is dead and all young people want new technology because in today’s generation of people they are tech savvy and want all the new “cool” things, but today’s generation doesn’t perceive books as technology. Technology is cold plastics and metals with a screen and buttons, books can hardly be related to technology.
    3. The reference to Ulysses, “stop the sea,” is talking about we might as well stop teach reading and writing because multimedia is taking over.
    4. The article states that there is an importance to reading and writing because we have a different learning process through reading and writing that we are not able to get through technology.
    5. I think that this moment will be remembered positively and it will be thought of as a step in the right direction for technology, rather than the death of books. There will always be technological advances continuing to support intellectual development; it will just be a different kind of intellectual development. It is a branch in a different direction than reading and writing. It will be a more efficient way to obtain knowledge.

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  8. Anyway on to the next one.

    1. Burkdall's thesis was/is that the development of new technologies and conveniences will sweep hard copy paper books and physically READING said books under the carpet, so to speak.
    2. It's the media's job to draw attention to issues that may have an
    effect <(quick side note: I had to go back into my notes to make sure I got that right...) on the human race as a whole in the future. To be honest though, I think the media may have aggrandized this one a little bit. I don't think ALL young people have turned their backs on reading books entirely. Yes there are things that make the process more appealing, but there are still those that, ''Love the feeling of a hard copy book in their palms, and being able to physically turn the page with their own fingers!'' ....ok in retrospect if thats the main reason why young people enjoy books still we are in trouble. I digress. The media's over blown sense of urgency to get this message to the general public is most likely to create that fear in those who grew up reading hard copies. Well maybe not ''fear'' but an awareness that they need to still work to preserve the literary works of art they grew up with.
    3. If the ''onslaught of multimedia'' isn't skewed from its current path our current concept of reading and writing could be altered for the worse.
    4. Reading and writing is an important step for people to understand the abstract or difficult aspect of human learning and thinking. I would agree with that. Given enough time and enough thought, people can manifest their most bizarre, abstract, and deep thoughts into the pages of a novel. Its been done many times before, because I STILL don't fully understand Kafka On the Shore! With access to such thoughts and ideas, it can give a person a better understanding of their own thought process.
    5. This moment in history will transpire into a joint understanding of the best of both worlds. Of course there will still be advances, but I'm sure there will be those who follow the fold and by a kindle/e-book. Then there will be those who make annual trips to Barns & Nobles.

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  9. 1. Burkdall believes that writing and technology techniques and processes need to practiced in order to teach and express ideas efficiently. One should not be favored over the other, but be treated as equal.
    2. The media believes this because they have no idea what they are talking about. This comment angers me because adults are constantly commenting on the new generation and their ideals/interests, but their comments are flawed and are mere stereotypes. The media believes this because they don't bother to study the students of the present and instead infer based on how they would act if they were in our position. The media believes that if something is more convenient, it is automatically better. This is false. Refer to my earlier comment if an explanation is required to clear things up.
    3. The allusion expresses that we need to prevent books from disappearing from our generation, and fight against the uprising of multimedia.
    4. The article states that the process of learning through reading and writing is unique and powerful. Learning as an individual through reading is effective because nobody else is telling you how to interpret something - everything is comprehended within yourself. I once heard a quote, "You cannot completely understand a subject/topic until you teach it to someone else." This quote also applies to writing. To fully master something, writing about it is necessary and it serves as another way to expand one's knowledge.
    5. I believe we are heading in the wrong direction. If technology continue to advance as it is while prominent traditions fade away, humanity will slowly fall apart. Already our work ethics are diminishing, and it is only going to get worse unless we practice our old processes and techniques. Technology will serve as a benefit to our education, but it has to be used in the right way. As Burkdall stated, we need to use a flawless mixture of both components to capitalize at this moment in time.

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  10. 1. Burkdall's thesis is that we need to find a balance between reading/writing and multimedia. One should not replace the other but ameliorate the process of using it. "Let me also be clear: I am not against teaching with multimedia, and on many occasions I require my students to create a number of such artifacts. But let us not discard print completely in favor of audio, visual, and/or audiovisual creations."
    2. The reason the multimedia is so quick to proclaim that reading books is dead is because they have witnessed over the years how new technologies make the old ones obsolete (i.e. computers, cell phones, etc.). It is a reoccurring pattern in our society that old technologies are push aside by new ones. However, books have been a part of the world for so long and have been so useful that I don't think there is any way for them to be "dead".
    3. By using the allusion of Ulysses, Burkdall is explaining that unless we stop the overthrowing of reading and writing by multimedia, "all is lost". We need to stop it now before we no longer can.
    4. My favorite quote from the article "Reading allows both contemplation and discourse, offering isolation and community" explains one reason reading is still important; it allows us to think in many different ways. Other reasons provided by the article are that reading has more than influenced the way we have developed as human beings and that in being able to understand someone's words without seeing their body language, facial expressions, and without hearing their tone of voice makes someone perceive many meanings and analyze the words to come up with what they see to be the meaning. I agree with the article because reading has been a cornerstone of human civilization for a very long time. Without it, we would not think, speak, or interact the way we do today. Society would be completely different.
    5. I think this moment in history will be seen as a time of great technological advancements, but also as a time of intellectual laziness. I think many of the tools we use today have taken analyzing out of people's thought process, causing those thoughts and ideas to be less intellectual. As people become more reliant on tools such as computers and cell phones, answers to the world's questions will be found with a click of a mouse instead of discussed between thinkers. Our reliance on technology will ultimately lead to our intellectual laziness.

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  11. 1. Burkdall's thesis emphasizes the importance of both reading and writing, as well as multimedia. Instead of choosing the "better" one, the focus is on teaching his students to be well rounded in their knowledge. It is good to stay updated on the newest technology, but we also can't forget the basics.
    2. I think the media comes to the conclusion that books are dead because technology is new and exciting. Books have been around for a long time, but when it comes to technology they keep thinking of ways to improve it and make it more appealing to young people. I also think they can tell that we are becoming very lazy. My little brother has a kindle and he just told me he likes it better than books because it's easier to click a button than turn a page.
    3. It is evident that books are being pushed aside. To stop this from continuing, we need to stop the advancements of multimedia and technology.
    4. I definitely agree with this article. "Reading allows both contemplation and discourse, offering isolation and community." You learn something from reading that can't be learned anywhere else. It allows you to enhance your imagination, while also improving your vocabulary and experiencing different writing styles. This article showed me the importance of reading and what it has done for us.
    5. I think this moment in history will be remembered as a time when people had a desire for knowledge. Even with these new technological advances, people are still focusing on making them better and more intricate. Some may say that it's encouraging us to be lazy but I don't necessarily agree with that. I think it's creating an environment that allows us to move towards a better understanding. It is very simple for me to type a question into Google. That doesn't make me lazy, it just shows that there are easy ways to find information. I don't think the advances in technology are encouraging us to relax our brain, it is simply making the process to achieve knowledge simpler.

    Nicole Anderson
    Period 2

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  12. 1.“Is reading dead? Is the teaching of writing becoming a more difficult exercise because of these mounting cultural pressures against reading and writing? It appears that we might as well "stop the sea" (as Leopold Bloom muses in Ulysses) as take up arms against the onslaught of multimedia.”
    2.The media eagerly concludes that young people want new tech because today’s generation is so focused on having the “next new thing” and has become so lazy they prefer to have something turn the pages for them.
    3.The allusion to Ulysses, “stop the sea” is saying we should basically stop trying to teach people reading and writing because the multimedia is taking over.
    4.Walter Ong said, "Without writing, the literate mind would not and could not think as it does. More than any other single invention, writing has transformed human consciousness." I agree, because reading and writing is one of the first things a human learns. It is the way we communicate and it works our minds and makes us think critically.
    5.This moment in history will be remembered as the step closer to technological advances. It will continue to support intellectual development, but in a different way. Society will have an easier way of obtaining knowledge.
    Lupe Perez Per. 3

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  13. 1. He expresses the importance of reading and writing, but believes society should embrace multimedia as well, incorporating both into learning.
    2. I think the media concludes that young people want new technology because that's what we express. Most people are hooked to their computers and update their phones and iPods every year or two. CD's have been completely replaced by streaming. When new things prove their worth, people get excited about it. The media is just using logic, they're not really accounting for sentimentality for books or that the book itself is part of the art form.
    3. I took it as meaning that he's addressing the common thought process that if reading and writing are dying, multimedia should be stopped.
    4. What stuck with me was the idea that books give you solitude as well as a conversation, teaching ideas yet leaving the person to interpret and decide everything for themselves. The idea that reading enriches communicating also makes complete logical sense to me, as well as increasing the ability to analyze. My friends that read often demonstrate those abilities, I definitely over-think things.
    5. I don't know much about new technology, so I don't really have a valid answer. Based off of the really popular gadgets, it seems like convenience and intellect are kept in mind. The internet is an astounding source of information and it's all instantly accessible. Video games seem to have grown from simplicity to intricate plot lines and tasks. I think physically, human beings are taught to relax, but not necessarily mentally.

    Dannielle Edwards, 4th.

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  14. 1. Burkdall's thesis is, "Let me also be clear: I am not against teaching with multimedia, and on many on many occasions I require my students to create a number of such artifacts. But let us not discard print completely in favor of audio, visual, and/or audiovisual creations." 
    2. I think that the media concludes that reading books are dead because they feel that kids from this generation want the newest technology, which eventually replace the old. The media feels like kids want the new technology and the easier way of reading a book. 
    3. The improvements in multimedia are destroying reading and writing. To stop it we would have to put an end to those improvements.   
    4. The article stresses that it is important to read because it sharpens communication skills. I do believe that reading is important because the knowledge you acquire from reading is important when you're older. 
    5. I think that this time in history will be remembered for all it's technological improvements. I believe it will continue to support intellectual development, even if it may  seem like it's much easier then the past. 

    Hunter Walker 
    Period 3

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  15. 1) "Let me also be clear: I am not against teaching with multimedia, and on many occasions I require my students to create a number of such artifacts. But let us not discard print completely in favor of audio, visual, and/or audiovisual creations. As Jonathan Swift suggested centuries ago in his novel Gulliver's Travels (1726), a concrete language is not enough. At the Academy of Lagado, Gulliver observes scholars carrying bags of objects to avoid the ambiguity of words, yet for abstract thought and expression, humans need the suppleness of meaning that only words afford. And we need certain conditions to appreciate or create such subtleties."

    2)I think that the media comes to this conclusion because people are usually so excited for the "next big thing". So they automatically assume that because these e-readers are the newest advancement in "book technology" everyone in the entire world is going to want one to fit in. But that's not true, because lots of people have different opinions about them as we learned in class.
    3) It's saying that the media is this huge sea that is swallowing all of our traditional ways and we need to stop it before books are gone forever.
    4) The article says that reading and writing are basic and fundamental parts of human nature and society and without them there is basically nothing to identify us from the rest of the world. I totally agree because these are the ways that we as humans communicate and they are a vital part of our society.
    5) I think that this moment in history will be remembered as the day when humanity got lazy. We rely so heavily on thinks that we think are going to make our life easier that we have all but forgotten how to do basic things. Sure some of the advances are for the better but it seems to me as if thee things are just being invented to give us an easier way to do something that is already easy enough in itself.

    Hannah Hosking period:4

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  16. 1. Burkdall’s thesis is stating that we can learn from many different things such as using multimedia and writing but he doesn’t want multimedia taking over everything.
    2. Media concludes that books are dead because the generation we are in now is more evolved with technology. This generation wants the latest and greatest, which is usually faster and more convenient. Some people in this generation would prefer new technology rather than the old technology. I think that it depends on what technology for the people to use. Such as an e-reader and a book. Younger generations would probably prefer an e-reader because of all the technology there is in this world.
    3. Ulysses allusion “stop the sea” means that multimedia might take over reading and writing, so we should stop reading and writing.
    4. This article by Burkdall states how important reading and writing is versus multimedia teaching. Everyone has a different way of thinking and a different way of learning things. I agree with that because when you’re reading or writing you have a connection with the author and different people have different thoughts on a certain subject.
    5. I think that this moment in history will be remembered by the advanced technology from the generations before. Technology will still advance and our minds will probably get lazy. I think that, eventually, people would stop using codex (like how we stopped using scrolls to use codex) and use more technology. All the technology is making everything easier for us, and we are depending more on technology to have the answers we are looking for.

    Chelsey Soriano Per. 3

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  17. 1.Burkdall's thesis is "Let me also be clear: I am not against teaching with multimedia, and on many occasions I require my students to create a number of such artifacts. But let us not discard print completely in favor of audio, visual, and/or audiovisual creations. As Jonathan Swift suggested centuries ago in his novel Gulliver's Travels (1726), a concrete language is not enough. At the Academy of Lagado, Gulliver observes scholars carrying bags of objects to avoid the ambiguity of words, yet for abstract thought and expression, humans need the suppleness of meaning that only words afford. And we need certain conditions to appreciate or create such subtleties."
    2. I think that the media concludes that reading books is dead and that people want the new technology because for the most part the majority of people do want the new tech like the latest iPad or smart phone, however a lot of people still like their books.
    3. It's saying that the media is getting rid of books so newer tech and take the place of those books
    4. The article explains that reading is important because it sharpens the analytical part of our brains. I agree with this because reading lets us exercise our language skills, such as vocabulary.
    5.I believe that this moment in history will be known as the beginning of a new, more connected, worldly society. Also, i believe
    technological advances will continue to support intellectual development because someone somewhere will always be trying to make something a little bit easier and more efficient.

    ReplyDelete
  18. 1."Let me also be clear: I am not against teaching with multimedia, and on many occasions I require my students to create a number of such artifacts. But let us not discard print completely in favor of audio, visual, and/or audiovisual creations."
    2.I think the media looks at how kids always want the newest technology and assume that it will be no different with them preferring a new kindle to an old book. The media puts all young people together in the same stereotype of wanting the newest technology; clearly from the split opinions in class they are not right in thinking that all younger people want new technology.
    3. Burkdall’s reference to Ulysses is that we must stop the advancement of multimedia before it completely wipes out reading and writing.
    4.The article says that reading and writing helps us think for ourselves and communicate more clearly. I agree, you become a better writer by reading great authors works and this can also help with communication skills by extending your vocabulary and not using such colloquial language all of the time. Also you must think for yourself you cant just go on sparknotes and learn what they think about the book.
    5.I believe that this moment in history will be remembered as an important time for technology. We have made many changes from vhs to dvd and record player to the ipod touch. Now we are changing from book to e-reader, but like cd’s are still widely sold still I believe books will still be around for a very long time.

    Kristen Frias
    p. 2

    ReplyDelete
  19. 1. "Rather than banishing writing or lamenting the development of multimedia, as Socrates famously deplored the introduction of writing, let us teach both writing and multimedia."
    2. Being that the basis of our assumption that most kids want to keep paperback books comes from the polling of AP english classes and thats only around 20% of Righetti, we may have a bit of a selection bias. Then again the same sort of statistics could easily have been slanted to generate favor and profit for ereaders.
    3.the allusion to Ulysses references when Leopold Bloom struggled with the infidelity of his wife Molly. Molly being the sea, fluid, uncontainable; trying to stop her would be impossible, "As easy stop the sea". Tieing the reference to the accusations of the death of reading, to some trying to save the archaic practice could be seen as a lost cause.
    4. Before being looked at as an art form (which by all means, writing is indeed an artform) as the craft has evolved into ever since the first folktales trancsended from the mouth to the page, writing and the result reading at its core is an infinite pursuit in the perfection of accuracy in communication. such a set of skills is should be preserved despite the ongoing laconic trend in our culture.
    5.http://www.youtube.com/user/TheRealBradNeely#p/a/F27C63A193729058/0/_WCiBPjckTg

    Trenton Class P.2

    ReplyDelete
  20. 1. Thomas Burkdall's thesis is, “Let me also be clear: I am not against teaching with multimedia, and on many occasions I require my students to create a number of such artifacts. But let us not discard print completely in favor of audio, visual, and/or audiovisual creations. As Jonathan Swift suggested centuries ago in his novel Gulliver's Travels (1726), a concrete language is not enough. At the Academy of Lagado, Gulliver observes scholars carrying bags of objects to avoid the ambiguity of words, yet for abstract thought and expression, humans need the suppleness of meaning that only words afford. And we need certain conditions to appreciate or create such subtleties.”
    2. I think most people in general are amazed and intrigued with the modern advances of technology. While we all set out to have the next best thing as technology rapidly advances, we lose sight of what's most important. Books are not just a simple story that can be supplemented with a screen, they are a piece of our history.
    3. The allusion to Ulysses means that if media is putting reading and writing in jeopardy, we should stop using it before it destroys them.
    4. The article states that we learn better from reading and writing. I agree, but i also think we learn a lot from personal experiences.
    5. I think technology and media will soon take over. They are so intriguing and easy that they will soon get more and more popular. It is a shame that we as a society are so lazy, but it is the sad truth.

    Briana Stinn
    Period 3

    ReplyDelete
  21. \Trenton Before I take a look at TheRealBradNeely do you want to describe how this informs your thinking on the question, or have you adopted someone else's idea wholesale as your own?

    ReplyDelete
  22. 1. Burkdall's thesis is that we should not banish reading, nor should we only teach multimedia. Both are useful and beneficial. "Each has distinct purposes and effects that students will discover as they explore their expressive and analytic potential."
    2. I believe that the media concludes this because our generation is constantly bombarded with new technology- and we buy it. They assume just because the product is new technology, young people will want to buy it.
    3. The allusion to Ulysses meant that we might as well conform to the new multimedia era, because there is no stopping it.
    4. The article said reading is important because, "Reading allows both contemplation and discourse, offering isolation and community." It claimed reading requires a deeper level of engagement and critical thinking than multimedia can provide. I agree with this because when reading, a person has to constantly make connections and actively think about what they're reading.
    5. This moment in history will support this era in history: an era of technological advances. Technological advances will continue, perhaps crippling intellectual development. There is a fine line between a tool, and something that does the work for you.
    Cayla Salazar Period 2

    ReplyDelete
  23. 1. "Let me also be clear: I am not against teaching with multimedia, and on many occasions I require my students to create a number of such artifacts. But let us not discard print completely in favor of audio, visual, and/or audiovisual creations. As Jonathan Swift suggested centuries ago in his novel Gulliver's Travels (1726), a concrete language is not enough. At the Academy of Lagado, Gulliver observes scholars carrying bags of objects to avoid the ambiguity of words, yet for abstract thought and expression, humans need the suppleness of meaning that only words afford. And we need certain conditions to appreciate or create such subtleties."
    2. The media assumes that people would rather have technology because they just want to bring out new stuff. They notice how people eagerly want anything new like the ipad or anything like it.
    3. The allusion of Ulysses "stop the sea" is trying to say that soon technology will take over and that books and writing will no longer exist anymore.
    4. The article states that reading is important because it enhances people's vocabulary, communication skills, and allows people to create images in their head. It also says that reading is a big part of learning and I agree. Reading has allowed me to expand my vocabulary and from it, I have learned so much and have been able to communicate.
    5. In my opinion, I do think that this time of our lives will be remembered. It will probably be remembered as the time that technology made the greatest difference in the lives of people. Eventually technology will end up growing more and people will forget about books or anything like that.

    Marisol Zepeda
    Period 6

    ReplyDelete
  24. 1. Burkdall's thesis is, "Rather than banishing writing or lamenting the development of multimedia, as Socrates famously deplored the introduction of writing, let us teach both writing and multimedia."
    2. There is truth in the media promoting young people to use new technology instead of books, because we always want the newest thing. Its human nature, to go for the new, and get rid of the old.
    3.It is merely stating that multimedia is taking over and soon reading and writing will no longer be.
    4.There is importance to reading because it sharpens communication skills. I agree reading is important because it strengthens not only our writing but also our conversational skills.
    5.This time in history will be remembered as the moment we took another step forward in advancing our country's technology. These steps in technology are making it easier for people to do things that are easy from the beginning. We are using technology as a crutch, and soon will be entirely reliant on technology.
    Miranda Perez 3rd period

    ReplyDelete
  25. 1. That writing and multimedia should both be used in society and education.
    2. They think that, because all the big honchos think that kids are in love with technology and that we hate everything "old fashioned".
    3. The allusion to Ulysses means that if media is taking over reading and writing, we should stop using it, before it completely destroys writing and reading.
    4. It states that reading helps you develop skills of expressing yourself and shows you different writing styles. I agree with him, because he's not lieing.
    5. Very soon, technology will take over everything we know. Considering it's already happening. There is no turning back now.

    Nicole Montoya
    period 3

    ReplyDelete
  26. Daniel Gonzalez Per.2September 11, 2011 at 6:27 PM

    1. His thesis states that text (on paper) and multimedia are not the same, therefore it would be a mistake to render paper text obsolete because they serve different purposes. “I am not against teaching with multimedia, and on many occasions I require my students to create a number of such artifacts. But let us not discard print completely in favor of audio, visual, and/or audiovisual creations. As Jonathan Swift suggested centuries ago in his novel Gulliver's Travels (1726), a concrete language is not enough.
    2. The media assumes this because young people want new technology, they want to stay up to date with everything like phones, computers, mp3s, etc., so the media concludes that, because we love a majority of all technology, we love any new advancement in technology.
    3. The allusion to Ulysses: it’s seriously impossible to halt the propelling run of the media and technological advances
    4. The article explains that reading is important because it sharpens the analytical part of our brains. I believe this claim because when you are reading something, you experience vocabulary, sentence structure, syntax and diction for yourself and when listening to an audio book it is mentally impossible to dissect the story because throughout the listening process you’re more focused on the plotline rather than words and their composition.
    5. I think that these moments in our history will be remembered and as technology and its advances continue to support intellectual development, these moments will be known as the time of transition to technology.

    Daniel Gonzalez
    Period 2

    ReplyDelete
  27. @Dr.Preston:

    I linked the vid because I feel that this a time where theres a crossroads between what there has been and whats to come. the book is meeting not only ereaders but new forms of social media which to some would wish to render it obsolete. Theres a fork in the road just like there was when the scroll shifted over to the codex, but this time it may be remembered as from when the "codex" succumbed to newer technology. Right now we're in a position where we need a good pair of 'nocs to see just where this road is taking us..

    Trenton P.2

    ReplyDelete
  28. 1) The thesis is: "Let me also be clear: I am not against teaching with multimedia, and on many occasions I require my students to create a number of such artifacts. But let us not discard print completely in favor of audio, visual, and/or audiovisual creations."
    2) Since technology is so popular and growing so rapidly, people assume that everyone is interested in it, when in reality there are still people that don't prefer technology for many different reasons.
    3) The allusion is saying that as the media continues to grow it will be harder to manage, so we must take care of it before it completely destroys reading and writing.
    4)The article says that reading helps expand your communication skills. I agree with this, because reading can put you into a piece of anyone's world, helping you experience anyone's opinion or point of view, as well as the way they think.
    5)I think that these moments in history will be known as a time where we realize how influential technology really is. It will continue to grow and be a part of more areas in every day life than it already is. I think it has the potential to help intellectual development as well as encourage us to relax our brains, depending on the type of technology and how we so choose to use it or depend on it.

    Candace Rickman
    Period 3

    ReplyDelete
  29. I wonder what all the answers are Dr. Preston? Haha
    1)He is saying that there are pros and there are cons, but each instrument can serve its purpose. Multimedia should not completely take over though.
    2) Personally I feel like everyone, or a vast majority of people always want to incriminate something whether it is true or not. The rise of the eReader seems just like any other like, dieting or cheating.
    3)The allusion is that media must be halted or it will destroy writing and reading.
    4)I wholeheartedly agree. Reading introduces you to new styles, new words and new types of people.
    5)I think those of us (and futurelings) who further ourselves education will feel a knack to read and write; education has had that affect on me.

    ReplyDelete
  30. 1. His thesis was that he isn't against teaching multimedia, but it shouldn't be the only way we go about teaching and learning.
    2. I think that the media assumes that young people don't like old school reading and other things like that because they want it to be that way. They want to sell products like all these new electronics.
    3. His allusion to Ulysses relates to the idea that we need to stop the use of multimedia or else it will wipe out reading and writing.
    4. I agree with the idea that reading is important. Every time I read something new I am learning more than what is laid out for me. I learn about different structures, styles, words and the way things can go.
    5. I think that this moment in history will be viewed as the time when technology erupted. I don't think that it is us backsliding or relaxing our brains to the point of atrophy. I don't believe that it is a negative that we are moving forward in technology, because I think that we will always have the urge to want to write and read. I don't think that will ever go away.

    -Cody Kiniry
    Period 4

    ReplyDelete
  31. 1. Both writing and multimedia needs to be taught so that both can be used, compared, and balanced in this "multimodal universe". "Rather than banishing writing or lamenting the development of multimedia, as Socrates famously deplored the introduction of writing, let us teach both writing and multimedia." (Last paragraph)

    2. The media thinks that young people want the "next best thing". And since books are "ancient" they are instead going to want the newest inventions such as kindles, iphones, ipods, etc.

    3. "It appears that we might as well "stop the sea" (as Leopold Bloom muses in Ulysses) as take up arms against the onslaught of multimedia." This is saying that we need to fight against and stop the advancements of technology in order to preserve reading and writing.

    4. "reading should be an 'incitement,' a unique means of prompting the reader to, in the strongest sense of the phrase, 'think for himself.' The article says that reading is important because it shapes the way we think. Without reading the human mind wouldn't think the same. I agree because reading develops intellect and without it everyone's intellect wouldn't be quite as developed.

    5. I think this point in time will be remembered as the time in which technology rapidly transformed the way the world works. I think that with the way technology is going it will encourage us to relax our brains as this is already happening. For instance, with students (myself included) referring to sparknotes.com for a summary on a book they didn't read.

    Kayla McCallie
    Per. 2

    ReplyDelete
  32. 1. Burkdall’s thesis is basically that students can be taught by both reading and multimedia. If they are taught to switch from one to another it teaches them to not favor one but to learn from both.
    2. Media concludes that technology is needed and reading is dead because it has constantly been seen that new technology comes along and replaces everything else. This society has started to become more about technology than anything else, but that is not completely true for ALL. Some people still use books and will continue using them for years to come since they have so much history.
    3. The allusion to Ulysses shows that books are being pushed aside and traded for technology. It is saying that we need to stop multimedia technology somehow.
    4. The article expresses that it is important to read because it helps us think and analyze in a different way. When you read you learn something that can not be learned in any other way. Writing has also allowed this society to develop the way it is, without reading it would not be the same. I completely agree that reading is something that can not be replaced. It has a feel to it like nothing else. When I read I think in a different way about the subject than I would if I saw it on television or in a technological way.
    5. I believe that this moment in history will be remembered as the era where technology began to take over old traditions (reading). Technological advances will continue to support intellectual development since it has become so common. The more technology advances the more that it will influence the way people think and act.

    ReplyDelete
  33. 1. Burkdall’s thesis states that instead of choosing multimedia or writing and reading we should teach and use both for both written text and multimedia presentation are equally effective in communication. They balance each other out and can create a memorable message when combined correctly

    2. Looking at why books seem to be “dead” in the media world seems to be obviously clear, media supports itself. Media is currently trying to compete with books for our attention. To use T.V as an example, how many movie trailers did one see for the 8th Harry Potter Movie? Now compare that number to this one, how many ads did one see for Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows book? For that matter, when was the last time a book was advertised on T.V? The media does not like to advertise its own economic adversary.

    3. The allusion to Ulysses refers to the fact that trying to stop the sea is a no win situation just like the suppression of any form of multimedia used nowadays.

    4. The article tells us that reading helps us develop and convey abstract ideas as well as giving surgical accuracy to analytical and research purposes. I am in complete agreement with the article because, while multimedia is spectacular at conveying a message, I have never once seen multimedia neither create an abstract idea that was not first written down nor help me in presenting my findings in an experiment.

    5. I believe that technology will help us find data, new findings big and small, convey messages and be the cushion of entertainment. I think that technology will never help anyone answer the questions that stimulate deep thought and create purpose in life. Technology is the vessel we use to explore the world around us while the written word is the flagship that carries us as we explore our own minds and potential. No one has ever been able to satisfy the question: what is my purpose in life, or why was I created at this time in this age, or even what happens after we die, but many people have found answers if not peace with the written word of books. I can back this up because a known book that helps us do just that is still the most published book in the world and it’s called the Bible.

    ReplyDelete
  34. 1. Thomas Burkdall's thesis is, "It appears that we might as well "stop the sea" as take up arms against the onslaught of multimedia."
    2. The media influences the younger audience to buy newer technology and focus on easier, faster options. For example, instead of buying a book at a bookstore, they insist on ebooks.
    3. He references Ulysses's quote "stop the sea" to compare it to the technological advancement in multimedia.
    4. Yes I think reading is very important. The article provides many points of support for the importance of reading. I agree most strongly with Walter Ong that through writing we are forced to learn and communicate clearly.
    5. Right now we are part of an age of technological advancements. It is a very important time that will be remembered forever, because we are creating new abilities for the world.

    ReplyDelete
  35. 1. Burkdall’s thesis states that instead of choosing multimedia or writing and reading we should teach and use both for both written text and multimedia presentation are equally effective in communication. They balance each other out and can create a memorable message when combined correctly

    2. Looking at why books seem to be “dead” in the media world seems to be obviously clear, media supports itself. Media is currently trying to compete with books for our attention. To use T.V as an example, how many movie trailers did one see for the 8th Harry Potter Movie? Now compare that number to this one, how many ads did one see for Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows book? For that matter, when was the last time a book was advertised on T.V? The media does not like to advertise its own economic adversary.

    3. The allusion to Ulysses refers to the fact that trying to stop the sea is a no win situation just like the suppression of any form of multimedia used nowadays.

    4. The article tells us that reading helps us develop and convey abstract ideas as well as giving surgical accuracy to analytical and research purposes. I am in complete agreement with the article because, while multimedia is spectacular at conveying a message, I have never once seen multimedia neither create an abstract idea that was not first written down nor help me in presenting my findings in an experiment.

    5. I believe that technology will help us find data, new findings big and small, convey messages and be the cushion of entertainment. I think that technology will never help anyone answer the questions that stimulate deep thought and create purpose in life. Technology is the vessel we use to explore the world around us while the written word is the flagship that carries us as we explore our own minds and potential. No one has ever been able to satisfy the question: what is my purpose in life, or why was I created at this time in this age, or even what happens after we die, but many people have found answers if not peace with the written word of books. I can back this up because a known book that helps us do just that is still the most published book in the world and it’s called the Bible.

    Jon Hoffman Period 2

    ReplyDelete
  36. 1. "Let me also be clear: I am not against teaching with multimedia, and on many occasions I require my students to create a number of such artifacts. But let us not discard print completely in favor of audio, visual, and/or audiovisual creations."
    2. I think that there is this preconceived notion that the "modern age teen" only has the desire to use the highest caliber of resources(not to suggest books are less resourceful then 'e-books'). Despite the fact that most of today's high-tech contraptions are used by teens, I like to think that there is an "old-soul" side to everyone.
    3. If media begins taking over reading/writing, we should eliminate reading/writing so it does not get taken over.
    4. To reuse Katie's favorite quote: "Reading allows both contemplation and discourse, offering isolation and community". Reading( a book)allows you to re-read something over and over again and each time it means something totally new and relevant to you.
    5. I am one of those who believe, to some degree, that mankind is only supposed to know so much information. I think about how the Ancient Egyptians are said to have technology that is in ways more advanced then today's technology. Then Bam! gone. I hope that we don't inherit the same fate; having it all then losing it.

    ReplyDelete
  37. (Just a a little side note this is the second time I do this homework because I clicked preview comment it erased it. Number one reason why i hate technology! I could've been finished if I would've written it out on paper)
    #1. The thesis describes Burkdall's feelings towards multimedia and Written text. He allows us to know that he neither hates nor favors multimedia because of its mindless use. "Let me also be clear: I am not against teaching with multimedia, and on many occasions I require my students to create a number of such artifacts. But let us not discard print completely in favor of audio, visual, and/or audiovisual creations."
    #2. Media comes to the conclusion that reading is dead and that young people have become more lenient to the new technology because of our careless reactions when a new book is released, compared to our ecstatic expressions as a new technology is put on the market. We have made it seem like we are better off without books and reading.
    #3.The allusion Ulysses that says "stop the sea" is letting us know that multimedia has become increasingly powerful and that if we do not stop it at some point it will be the only thing left for the future. We are the ones who have to prevent its power from growing and by killing it altogether we can do so.
    #4. The article says that reading helps us with our development of different perspective and to be able to analyze things as we please. Unlike multimedia which is mindless and only encloses our intellect into a little pocket in our brain. I somewhat agree with reading's importance because it ultimately is our future, depending how much knowledge we acquire. On the other hand not all people have time to sit down and read a good book. Multimedia is able to help summarize things without being such a hassle.
    #5.I think that the people in the future will remember us as the people who were too lazy to use their intellect and so instead they developed easy ways out of doing so. They will thin of us as the generation who put their brains to sleep for a while and let the technology do the learning for them.

    ReplyDelete
  38. 1)“Rather than banishing writing or lamenting the development of multimedia, as Socrates famously deplored the introduction of writing, let us teach both writing and multimedia.” Burkdall's thesis tells us that the beautiful creation of both writing and multimedia should be drawn together and used to our fondness.
    2)The media thinks that young people are great targets when it comes to new technology. Compared to the wiser beings of our world, us young people are more intrigued to being "up tp date". But thats where they are mistaken even though new things are nice, most of us can relate to something "old fashioned" because of our culture or past in some other way.
    3)The allusion to Ulysses tells us that multimedia will be the cause of the loss of reading and writing. So let us stop using multimedia, but at the cost of reading and writing.
    4)The article states that reading and writing are a huge part of our lives in many ways. I agree with this whole-heartedly. If it weren't for these two significant things, we wouldn't have the break throughs of life because reading and writing is not just used for literature but for everything else from our lives from medicine to business.
    5)This moment in history would be considered the "break-through of technology" and it will continue to grow until the point where books will only be a mere memory. But then again books will probably come back. Isn't that a "flaw" of ours we always go back to the past whether it's polotics or fashion or anything else.

    Annais Acosta
    per. 6

    ReplyDelete
  39. 1. "Rather than banishing writing or lamenting the development of multimedia, as Socrates famously deplored the introduction of writing, let us teach both writing and multimedia. Each has distinct purposes and effects that students will discover as they explore their expressive and analytic potential." His thesis basically states that we should continue to develop both writing and multimedia, not eliminate one and move forward with the other.

    2. Multimedia assumes that books are dead and young people want new technology because it has seen over the years how far technology has come with its updates. These changes have made pieces of technology, like laptops or cell phones, more popular among teenagers because we always want what's best, new, or popular. Books don't look as cool as the latest iPod to young people.

    3. The allusion of "stop the sea" refers to the fact that we need to stop depending on the development of multimedia as the brighter future. We need to also focus on classic styles of writing and books instead of encouraging technology to take over completely.

    4. "Reading allows both contemplation and discourse, offering isolation and community." This quote describes why we need reading and writing in our society. To eliminate its purpose would be like forgetting a part of how we live. We would interact differently without those basics; our speech would change, our conversations would lack structure, and language wouldn't have the same effect. Reading and writing are necessary skills that human civilization feed off of to live.

    5. With the constant upgrades in technology and multimedia, I believe history will look back and notice the progressive advances as great accomplishments. However, these advances are also causing society to slow down mentally and we are increasingly becoming lazier. We depend too much on the latest gadgets to do the work that our minds should be doing. The engineers and inventors that are increasing our technological capabilities may receive credit for the work they have done, everyone else will be looked upon as inattentive and careless.

    -Kelly Brickey, Period 3

    ReplyDelete
  40. 1. His thesis states that he is not against teaching with multimedia, but it cannot be the sole source of information and ways of learning. Reading alone cannot be the only way of learning anymore. Having said that, internet use and electronic learning cannot be the only way either; it has to be a harmonious mix of both.
    2. When people think of "media" it is often related to kids and younger generations who always want the newest technological device. It convinces and influences people to move away from "outdated" things like reading, to using things such as the internet, or an electronic book.
    3. The allusion to Ulysses describes the dangers of using media, and how our population needs to be careful of how much of it we use, because it could potentially wipe out books altogether. It states that technology has taken over people's lives and in a sense brainwashed them.
    4. I have always believed reading is important. Every study for education and intelligence is somehow measured by our ability to read. This generation and society today is so concerned about making things easier so people don't have to think, which is a shame. Yes, reading enhances our communication skills, and helps our societies to progress.
    5. This will forever be remembered as the "techy age" where technology advanced so quickly, that no one could keep up. Technology is our best friend and also our worst enemy, all depending on how the individual decides to use it. In some ways I think technology is making people lazier. Take this blog for example.. on Microsoft Word the auto spell-check will capitalize our i's and the word at a beginning of a sentence. It's funny to see people's mistakes on things like that, but it makes sense because our generation is used to having it corrected automatically. It's kind of funny.

    Kaley Jorgensen Per: 2

    ReplyDelete
  41. 1. The thesis is that children need to be taught with both writing and multimedia skills to survive in the world today. However, it was apparent to me that he was not happy about this. That multimedia is ripping the traditions out from under us.
    2. The media influences the younger audience by coming up with new technologies such as the iPad or iPhone, they do this because once someone adopts the trend it is easier to get other people to go along with it.
    3. "stop the sea," compare the sea with today's technology, you cannot stop it.
    4. I do believe reading is important. I myself read everyday but I do not think it makes a difference if you read a book or a Kindle. The article provides a lot of support for reading. I agree with the idea that when we read we learn without realizing it. Different styles and communication methods.
    5. As of right now I feel we will be remembered as the era that changed because we are being introduced to tons of new information and advancements

    Lizzie Level
    P.2

    ReplyDelete
  42. 1) The thesis is: "Let me also be clear: I am not against teaching with multimedia, and on many occasions I require my students to create a number of such artifacts. But let us not discard print completely in favor of audio, visual, and/or audiovisual creations."

    2) The media thinks young people want new tech over old tech is because the majority of us do. Many kids won't admit to it, but anything "new" is exciting, so of course they would come to that conclusion.

    3) The allusion to Ulysses is used to say that we need to stop with all this new technology or else we will lose reading and writing as a whole.

    4) The article says that reading is important to being acceptable in society. I agree with this specific point, but i disagree with many of the other points made.

    5)I think all these advancements in technology will just help us in the long run. People are just scared that it is going to turn us into fat, lazy jerks like it did in "Wall-e". People have enough self control to still exercise and do what they need to stay healthy.

    Nathan Seidenberg
    P. 3

    ReplyDelete
  43. 1. “Let me also be clear: I am not against teaching with multimedia, and on many occasions I require my students to create a number of such artifacts. But let us not discard print completely in favor of audio, visual, and/or audiovisual creations. As Jonathan Swift suggested centuries ago in his novel Gulliver's Travels (1726), a concrete language is not enough. At the Academy of Lagado, Gulliver observes scholars carrying bags of objects to avoid the ambiguity of words, yet for abstract thought and expression, humans need the suppleness of meaning that only words afford. And we need certain conditions to appreciate or create such subtleties.”
    2. I think that the media so eagerly concluded that reading books is dead because nowadays we become so lazy and yield to what’s fast and more convenient. We don’t really want to take the time to flip pages and instead, we rather have something do it for us.
    3. It means that because media seems to be powerfully overtaking reading and writing that media should quickly be stopped before it completely obliterates it.
    4. I believe that this article is saying that reading is very critical and essential. And I agree with this because I feel reading and writing will always be the official ground work to expanding our knowledge and learning new things.
    5. I think that this time in history will be remembered because of all its technological improvements. It not only will help make our lives easier but probably also lazier. Even though it will create new and modern ways to do things, it doesn’t change the fact how indolent we will become of it. We often tend to rely so much on technology for the answers and to figure things out for us that we lose the essence to manually doing things on our own.

    Jolissa Jiles p.4

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  44. 1. “Let me also be clear: I am not against teaching with multimedia, and on many occasions I require my students to create a number of such artifacts. But let us not discard print completely in favor of audio, visual, and/or audiovisual creations. As Jonathan Swift suggested centuries ago in his novel Gulliver's Travels (1726), a concrete language is not enough. At the Academy of Lagado, Gulliver observes scholars carrying bags of objects to avoid the ambiguity of words, yet for abstract thought and expression, humans need the suppleness of meaning that only words afford. And we need certain conditions to appreciate or create such subtleties.”
    2. I think the Media is saying that young people all want new tech because its true. Id much rather have an Ereader than a bunch of books. During our Socratic Seminar I heard many interesting reasons for books being better than e readers. Some people liked the smells, the sounds and the stains of really books. Its cool that a person can say " oh yeah, this stain is from last Christmas.. good times." What about the stains you can"t identify? My point is books have no real benefit or advantage over e readers.
    3.It means that if media is taking over reading and writing, and we should stop it.
    4.The article is telling us is that is important to read because it keeps us from getting stupid and becoming overly dependent on information being feed to us.I believe that reading is important.
    5.I believe this moment in history will be remember as the time where we decided technology is more efficient than reading a book. New technology supports intellectual development because technology is about progressing. We can use this to learn how to make our older and more complicated ways of life more efficient. If you don't keep up with technology it will leave you behind.
    Gary Case Period 2

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  45. Mariah cooks p.2

    1. We need to find a balance between reading/writing and multimedia. "Let me also be clear: I am not against teaching with multimedia...But let us not discard print completely in favor of audio, visual, and/or audiovisual creations."
    2.  Because the media has continuously witness old technologies become replaced by  new technologies.  Having old technologies replaced by new ones has been frequent pattern in society. An exception to this is books. Books have been a huge part of education and the world for so long that it's very hard to even imagine books being completely "dead". 
    3. Burkdall explains through the allusion of Ulysses that we must "stop the sea" implying that we need to stop, take a step back away From technology, and teach reading and writing.  And if we don't do this "all is lost" because technology and multimedia is taking over.  If we don't stop it now then it will be too late.  
    4. Yes i agree that reading is important. This article provides many points of support for of the importance of reading. "Through writing we are forced to learn to communicate early..." -Walter Ong 
    5. In my opinion, this moment in history is a new beginning for society. A technological wave is what is to come of this age. The stream of technological advances that will occur I'n this era will be what it's going to be known for.  And becAuse of the these advances, I believe it will cause intellectual reliance on technology.  Which will result In complete laziness across the globe.

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  46. 1. Burkdall's thesis is that writing and reading has it's importance but we should also embrace multimedia and use both in education and society.
    2. The media concludes that reading is dead and young people want new technology because that is the stereotype our generation holds. Because the younger generation enjoys technology more than others it's concluded that we obsess over any new technology. Kids also have a reputation for hating reading which in most cases isn't true.
    3. The allusion to Ulysess "stop the sea" is used to make a point that trying to stop the inevitable onslaught of technology would be about as useless as trying to stop the sea.
    4. I agree with all statements about the importance of reading and writing, the brain is a muscle that has to be excersized just like our calves and glutes reading and writing generate a mental process that listening and seeing cannot.
    5. I believe this time in history will be seen similarly to the enlightenment; the beginning of a new era. Technology will undoubtedly continue to advance along with multimedia, but this era is the beginning of the change. We are in the transition having to choose between the new sciences of technology and the old ways of ancient reading and writing.
    With the advancement of technology I believe humans will become more developed science and tech wise but language and good, proper writing will start to disintegrate. Reliance on tools is not comforting to me, our basic understanding of language, reading, and writing is responsible for all human advancement if it is forgotten and unapppreciated what do we have to fall back on? It takes intelligence to understand technology in depth and create multimedia ( anyone with a computer knows this) so with increasing technology our brains won't atrophy but they will loose the art of the creation and in depth understanding of language.

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  47. 1) "Rather than banishing writing or lamenting the development of multimedia, as Socrates famously deplored the introduction of writing, let us teach both writing and multimedia." Instead of going "all or none", we can effectively use both old and new.

    2)Because of examples in other fields, like health, where the youth prefers to "virtually" run in the kinect or WII instead experiencing the real thing outside. Some kids would prefer to read on an e-reader because they're more comfortable with a screen when they could simply read a book

    3)"trying to stop the sea" - it would be futile to try to control the sea or nature from taking its course, whatever it may be, just as it would be equally aimless to attempt to keep multimedia from taking credit away from the book

    4)it is important to keep on reading and writing, it's a different learning process than through technology like an e reader

    5)These times will be remembered as the days that technology replaced books and ideas with invisible, shapeless information on a hard-drive. I don't think this transition has caused our minds to atrophy just yet, but there are gestures that this is already taking place like the internet giving students the ease to plagiarize work, no longer thinking for themselves therefore a form of "brain atrophy"

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  48. Dania Hatamleh, Period four

    1. Burkdall's thesis is that writing "further enhances learning" and provides some insight than perhaps media can't give, although media can also be a helpful tool.

    2. The media concludes that reading books is dead and young people want new technologies because they assume all of the younger generations are attracted to the idea of having the newer technology, which is not endangering physical writing.

    3. "It appears that we might as well 'stop the sea' (as Leopold Bloom muses in Ulysses) as take up arms against the onslaught of multimedia." The allusion is that media's growth is impossible to stop, as is stopping the sea.

    4. "Writing, I would argue, further enhances learning, since written communication demands a set of conditions and intellectual skills different from those needed for speech or multimedia texts." I agree reading is important because you learn so much from it and there is an endless amount of information you can read. I truly think that reading makes people more intelligent.

    5. I think this era will be remembered as the beginning of our progression to more advanced technology and a step away from the more manual things.

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  49. 1. Burkdall's thesis is that both multimedia and writing should be taught to our youth. There is no reason why we should replace one for another. It is possible to learn and use both."...let us teach both writing and multimedia.”
    2. It seems as though our generation of youth is always moving forward to the next technological advancement, so media can only conclude that books will be left behind.Our youth wants what is easier and takes less effort, so rather than flipping a page themselves they will let a piece of technology do it for them. Books are growing to be a thing of the past and with the way we are progressing it is only fair that the media believes that reading books is dead.
    3. The author refers to Ulysses in order to show that we need to stop the immense amount of technological advancements in order to preserve books.
    4. This article states that reading is important because it allows us to grasp more abstract ideas and thoughts. It is also the basis of a lot of creations. "Few of us can make a compelling point in an audio essay or create a voice-over for a short film without first creating a script." Both reading and writing is important because it allows us to create. Even technology starts off with a written blueprint of some sort that a person must read.
    5. I believe that this moment in history will be remembered as the demise of intellect but the rise of technology. Yes technology allows us to advance into the future, but it only allows for us to become lazy in our pursuit of knowledge. Technology will end up doing all the thinking for us, and at this point it is something that we will just have to sadly accept.
    Kelli Carrillo p.3

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  50. 1. Burkdall's thesis is "Rather than banishing writing or lamenting the development of multimedia, as Socrates famously deplored the introduction of writing, let us teach both writing and multimedia. Each has distinct purposes and effects that students will discover as they explore their expressive and analytic potential."

    2. I think that seeing so much text makes some people less eager to read. However, they are attracted to things like computers and iPods and other things that have developed technologically over the years. Therefore they assume that soon all young students will take this same stance and switch to only technology for even reading.

    3. In Ulysses the phrase "stop the sea" is used as an expression for what is so hard it is almost impossible. It is used here to say that technology will take over it is useless to try and stop it.

    4. The importance of reading is that we can improve the way we speak and think. We can have a different thought process and see things from other peoples' point of views. I agree that reading is important for these reasons because I think that it does indeed improve the way we think and percieve things.

    5. I believe that even though technological advances may be trying to help, it will only end up hidering education. With all the distractions that come with technology I believe that reading will fade to the side into a "what once was".

    Taryn Kawahara period 2

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  51. 1. Burkdall's thesis is that writing and media should be used simultaneously in the classroom. "Rather than banishing writing or lamenting the development of multimedia, as Socrates famously deplored the introduction of writing, let us teach both writing and multimedia."
    2. I think that people believe youngsters want the latest and greatest technology because we were born into a technology revolution. Teenagers constantly are texting, or listening to an ipod, or surfing the web. Books seem like something of the past in comparison to these modern day gadgets.
    3. The allusion hints that society needs to stop shoving books out of the way for multimedia. We can't stop the advancement of multimedia, just as we can't "stop the sea," but that doesn't mean that historical texts should be forgotten along the way.
    4. I definitely agree with this article. "I believe that reading, in its original essence, . . . [is] that fertile miracle of a communication effected in solitude." Reading is a way to escape; you can leave everything behind you for a time and enter into another world. That is something I could not give up.
    5. I think that technology has made society lazy. Due to this, I think that our reliance on tools will encourage us to relax our brains. LIfe is so rushed that everyone tries to take shortcuts and get everything done as fast as possible to get ahead. This has led to a greater reliance on technology to help us get things done in the easiest way.

    Arianna Farmer
    Period 2

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  53. Burkdall muses that we shouldn't try to stop the advancement of technology or try to extinguish books, but we should use both technologies because both offer advantages that are advantageous to humanity.

    Media sources push the e-book upon the consumer, announcing that the book is dead and obsolete. But this is erroneous. The book is still used and quite often at that. The reason for such accusations are so that the consumer will buy more e-books and profit companies.

    Burkdall references Ulysses, stating that you might as well "stop the sea," then try and fight against the onslaught of the media for e-books. Resisting modern technology is in vain.

    Reading helps to the develop the human mind through ways unique to it. Reading helps to bring humanity together while still isolating it. People can read each others thoughts without actually talking to them. Reading has helped to make us the way that we are, and without it we wouldn't be the same according to Burkdall. I beg to differ. Humans can still be sophisticated and intelligible without reading or writing. Socrates, the great philosopher, resisted reading and writing, and instead defaulted on oral language rather then written. This shows that humanity can still grow and discourse without a written language.

    This shift from the formal book to the e-book will be remembered no more then the shift from the scroll to the codex. The common man doesn't think about the shift from one technology to another 500 years from when it took place. Only historians will really care about it and even then. E-books will become such a normal part of life that people won't even look back on the formal book. As to intellectual development, humanity will continue to develop. The e-book might help to accelerate the process, but even without e-books or modern technology, humanity would still grow. Technology will not dull intelligence. Humanity will always be the same.

    Nicholas Joshua Lycan
    Period 4

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  54. 1) Burkedall’s thesis: "Let me also be clear: I am not against teaching with multimedia, and on many on many occasions I require my students to create a number of such artifacts. But let us not discard print completely in favor of audio, visual, and/or audiovisual creations….rather than banishing writing or lamenting the development of multimedia, as Socrates famously deplored the introduction of writing, let us teach both writing and multimedia."
    2) I think the media eagerly concludes that reading with a codex is ‘out’ and that reading on an e-reader is ‘in’ is because of all of the hype surrounding other technology. The media assumes the youth will be just as excited for convenience as we have been with ipods, laptops, smartphones, etc. But can the media be blamed for that? Based on that, it’s not as if we’ve proven them differently. (That is except for Preston’s classes…maybe ‘the media’ should have done more research…)
    3) The allusion to Ulysses refers to the onslaught of uninformed opinions such as this one presented by the media that must be fought against tooth and nail.
    4) The article states that reading, bluntly speaking, beefs up your communication skills. I agree with this. You can only learn so much from speaking a language; in order to know it, you have to use it.
    5) This movement in history will probably be remembered as any other part of history: with slight amusement by some, eye rolling by others, and by others still, as a time when people sought to simplify their lives even further. As to technological advancement, my view is straightforward. Technology can and will boost intellectual advancement to previously unheard of heights, until it becomes a distraction from the goal. When the only concern is somehow obtaining the latest and greatest of the technology, (and not actually using it to expand one’s potential) that’s when technology is detrimental to our brains and their ability to function.

    Emily Martinez
    Period 3

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  55. 1) Instead of being the one the dominates the other, it should be synergistic. I'm sure the minds of both sides are asking "Why can't we be friends?"

    2) We are the media generation, man! Technology runs pretty much our entire lives, yet... Our generation may have been surrounded by all of this (more or less) we are actually in the middle. Granted we use our phones and computers to a day to day basis, it's just adding fuel to the fire of the stereotype.

    3) A small, little hint saying that trying to stop this media blitzkrieg is like trying to slow down your car without brakes. Some things aren't made for the e-books. Yea, they have it, but you'll never get that same feel.

    4) I'm going to agree with Arianna (and the text), reading is amazing. I may not read much, but books like Kite Runner really sucked me in."I believe that reading, in its original essence, . . . [is] that fertile miracle of a communication effected in solitude."

    5) Tech obviously made us much lazier, but in areas, it really helps. Uncle Ben once said, "With great power, comes great responsibility." We haven't been responsible, I can tell you that much.

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  56. 1. Burkdall's thesis is “I am not against teaching with multimedia, and on many occasions I require my students to create a number of such artifacts. But let us not discard print completely in favor of audio, visual, and/or audiovisual creations."

    2. I think the reason the media concludes that young people want the new tech is because they are trying to get people to go out and buy an e-reader. They are merely trying to convince you to spend your money on an e-reader.

    3. The allusion is that technology is taking over books and writing. If we don’t do anything to stop it, it will eventually take over reading and writing.

    4. The reasons the article provides for the importance of reading are that reading and writing have altered us, and they cause us to think differently about everything. I agree with what he says because if you can read, you can think about things differently and see things from a new perspective.

    5. I think this moment in history will be remembered as the beginning of when technology really began to take off and become a part of most people’s lives. I think that technology will be able to both support our intellectual development as well as make things easy for us. What makes the difference is how you use it.

    Mitchell Edmondson P4

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  59. 1. Burkdall's thesis is that reading should not be banished, nor should multimedia only be used. "Each has distinct purposes and effects that students will discover as they explore their expressive and analytic potential."
    2. I believe the media has this conclusion because our generation is constantly bombarded with new technology- and we buy it. They think because it is new technology, young people will buy want to buy it.
    3. The allusion to Ulysses means we should just conform to the era of multimedia, since there is no stopping it.
    4. The article says reading is important because, "Reading allows both contemplation and discourse, offering isolation and community." It claims reading provides a deeper level of critical thinking and focus than multimedia does. I agree with this because when reading, a person must visualize what they're reading and actively think about it.
    5. This moment in history will be remembered as this generation will be remembered- one of technological advances. Technological advances will continue, perhaps crippling intellectual development. If the technological advances ever do the work for you rather than being just a tool, that's when people will become lazy and mindless.
    Cayla Salazar Period 2

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  60. 1. Thesis: “Let me also be clear: I am not against teaching with multimedia, and on many occasions I require my students to create a number of such artifacts. But let us not discard print completely in favor of audio, visual, and/or audiovisual creations. As Jonathan Swift suggested centuries ago in his novel Gulliver's Travels (1726), a concrete language is not enough. At the Academy of Lagado, Gulliver observes scholars carrying bags of objects to avoid the ambiguity of words, yet for abstract thought and expression, humans need the suppleness of meaning that only words afford. And we need certain conditions to appreciate or create such subtleties.”

    2. Media tries to push these beliefs about the book being dead as a promotional movement to try to get the reader to buy into this and go out and purchase an ereader even though this is completely false.

    3. The reference to Ulysses is that it is impossible to "stop the sea". By this the article is stating that the wave of technology in ereaders is impossible to push away and "stop". It is inevitable and unstoppable in it's relentless push to the consumers' households.

    4. The article states that reading is important in many ways to help develop our brain and thought process by making us think in new ways and even by provoking and leading to conversations with other people. This helps us on a social level and a mental level. Although it is possible to be very educated and bright without reading, mainly by questioning and being philosophical, it isn't very practical and I think it is a necessity to be able to read and write in order to become educated.

    5. Obviously there are plenty of technological advancements that are only here to be more "beneficial" to us and basically make us more lazy, but in general technology is fantastic and today's world will be remembered as a push for a better world where knowledge is even closer to our fingertips as we proceed in advancements in medicine and in making the internet more accessible to help people learn new things.

    ian Janssen P.4

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  61. 1) Burkdall's thesis is that as technology advances the uses of hard copy and books will become irrelevant and will soon die out. (the use of this blog is an example of how we are supporting it, by posting homework onto the blog and not turning in a hard copy of hw)
    2) The media believes we will grow tired of books and move onto the new technology of e-books, because history has proved to the population of people that we all want to have the most relevant and newest technology.
    3) The allusion of Ulysses "stop the sea" infers that we should stop using technology to replace the reading of books.
    4) Reading a book provides you with a source in which you can reread a text and every time have it mean a different thing to you.
    5) I believe that this society will be remembered as a technological society, because within the last 10 years there has been at least on huge technological advance. I also believe that the uses of all the new technological tools has made our society very lazy.

    Max Kuhlman
    Per 2

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  62. 1. Burkdall believes that writing and technology techniques and processes need to practiced in order to teach and express ideas efficiently. One should not be favored over the other, but be treated as equal.
    2. The media believes this because they have no idea what they are talking about. This comment angers me because adults are constantly commenting on the new generation and their ideals/interests, but their comments are flawed and are mere stereotypes. The media believes this because they don't bother to study the students of the present and instead infer based on how they would act if they were in our position. The media believes that if something is more convenient, it is automatically better. This is false. Refer to my earlier comment if an explanation is required to clear things up.
    3. The allusion expresses that we need to prevent books from disappearing from our generation, and fight against the uprising of multimedia.
    4. The article states that the process of learning through reading and writing is unique and powerful. Learning as an individual through reading is effective because nobody else is telling you how to interpret something - everything is comprehended within yourself. I once heard a quote, "You cannot completely understand a subject/topic until you teach it to someone else." This quote also applies to writing. To fully master something, writing about it is necessary and it serves as another way to expand one's knowledge.
    5. I believe we are heading in the wrong direction. If technology continue to advance as it is while prominent traditions fade away, humanity will slowly fall apart. Already our work ethics are diminishing, and it is only going to get worse unless we practice our old processes and techniques. Technology will serve as a benefit to our education, but it has to be used in the right way. As Burkdall stated, we need to use a flawless mixture of both components to capitalize at this moment in time.

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  63. 1)Burkdall’s thesis is that we should not completely forget about writing or use multimedia too much, but that we should learn to create some sort of balance between the two.
    2)I think the media so eagerly concludes that reading books is dead because so many people now a days think technology is the easy way out. For example, today many books have been made into movies so people would rather watch the movie instead of taking the time to read a book. Young people all want new tech because it’s more “up to date” and new technology grabs their attention more than just a simple old book.
    3)The allusion to Ulysses is trying to say that we might as well give up on keeping the idea of reading and writing since more and more people are more focused on using the new technology since it makes things easier.
    4)The article states that the importance of reading is to help us think for ourselves and that “Written words sharpen analysis.” It helps us analyze of the meaning of something and help us become more clear on what we are trying to say. I agree with this because reading helps us to expand our thoughts instead of using technology to do it for us.
    5)I think this moment in history will be remembered more as the advance in technology and how it began to become so important.

    Jessica Manriquez; Per. 6

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  64. 1) The thesis is “Rather than banishing writing or lamenting the development of multimedia, as Socrates famously deplored the introduction of writing, let us teach both writing and multimedia.” This explains to us that writing and multimedia should be used together.
    2)The media thinks that the youth of our generation are always moving forward with new advancements in technology. Almost as if, they are just searching for something new all the time that will "make their lives easier". Thus, leaving books behind.
    3)The allusion means mutlimedia causes us to lose reading and writing if we don't try to stop it.
    4)I think reading is very important, the article itself provided multiple facts that supported reading. I agree completely, I think that reading has so much more for the reader to gain from.
    5)Personally, I believe that this moment in history will be remembered mainly for it's technology usage, and advancements. I think it won't stop growing anytime soon. There's chances that it will completely leave books forgotten about, but I think that, if bad fashion from the 80's can become stylish again, then I see no reason for them not to make a come back.

    Adriana Zamudio
    per 4

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  65. 1. "Let me also be clear: I am not against teaching with multimedia, and on many occasions I require my students to create a number of such artifacts. But let us not discard print completely in favor of audio, visual, and/or audiovisual creations."
    2. I think the media makes this conclusion because of the growth of technology and how many people want whats new. Books are something in the past for people now and technology is now something important in our everyday lives.
    3. The allusion of Ulysses "stop the sea" is saying that if multimedia continues to grow it will get rid of the reading of books and take over.
    4. The article provides information on the importance of reading with messages saying reading enhances your thinking in new ways. Reading helps with communication and understanding ideas in different ways.
    5. I think in this moment in history we will be remembered as a technological world, where technology runs our lives and continues to grow and even replace what use to be. By the new technology in this world our society and lives will be changed to the point of being lazy and unable to find information on our own.

    period 3

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  66. 1.)Burkdall's thesis:"Let me also be clear: I am not against teaching with multimedia, and on many occasions I require my students to create a number of such artifacts. But let us not discard print completely in favor of audio, visual, and/or audiovisual creations." He is not against multimedia and believes that it should be be taught to the youth along with writing.
    2.)I think that the media concludes that reading books is dead because of how we react when new technology is released. As soon as the latest iPod or iPhone comes out, everyone rushes to buy one.
    3.)The allusion to Ulysses serves to show that the media is taking over reading and writing but that we should stop it before it gets to the point where reading and writing is destroyed.
    4.) In the article it states that "reading allows both contemplation and discourse" and that "written words can sharpen or analysis." I agree with this because I do feel that reading helps us to clearly express ourselves and understand others without having to see their facial expressions and such.
    5.)Although I do think that in many cases the advancement in technology has helped support our intellectual advancement, I feel that this moment in history will be remembered differently. I think that technological advances will be seen as something that has made us too lazy to think for ourselves.

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  67. 1. His thesis is that he is not against the use of multimedia in teaching or learning, we should continue to develop both multimedia and writing.

    2. The media's conclusion that all young people prefer new tech rather than old tech is inaccurate. Many young people strongly prefer a book over an e-reader, as displayed during the socratic seminar. The media ignores this because they want to promote new technologies so more people will purchase them.

    3.His allusion to Ulysses relates to the idea that we need to stop the use of multimedia or else it will completely eliminate reading and writing.

    4. I agree with the article's emphasis on the importance on reading. The expansion of human knowledge and intelligence is dependent on reading. Books provide information and various perspectives that would otherwise be lost in between generations.

    5. I think this moment in history will be viewed as a constantly progressive period in society. Everything is faster and more advanced than it was a year ago. These new developments in technology are supporting intellectual development.

    -Patrick Fraire
    P.3

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  68. Jojo Relyea
    Per. 3

    1)"Let me also be clear: I am not against teaching with multimedia, and on many occasions I require my students to create a number of such artifacts. But let us not discard print completely in favor of audio, visual, and/or audiovisual creations."
    2) I think the media is trying to tap into young peoples use of all this new technology. They are concluding that for example. "Well if they all would rather talk through a phone or computer instead of face to face contact they would rather read digitally than from a book in their hands."
    3) The allusion of Ulysses is trying t get across that if this massive growth in multimedia not only continues, but escalates books will be completely replaced by e readers.
    4) The article said, "reading should be aniincitement, a unique means of prompting the reader to, in the strongest sense of the phrase, think for himself." Reading molds our minds from the first day we ever look at a text or book. I agree, to me reading is extremely important. It develops our mind and thinking. We wouldn't be the human beings we are without it.
    5) Honestly, I think we will be remembered as an era of, excuse my french, but lazy asses. In some ways that is true. Kids would rather sit in front o the television or let a computer do everything for them. But we as a species is more educated than ever do to the mass amount of information we have available to us. This information can be from a computer or a kindle, it doesn't matter. Once we properly learn how to balance our use of technology and put its benefits to good use we will be remembered as the most powerful era of all time. Some of us may be fatter than any generation ever was, but at least we'll be smarter :)

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  69. 1. Burkdall's thesis regarded the use of multimedia interfaces alongside writing. He wants future generations to continue technologic advances without getting rid of pen and paper.
    2. The media concludes that young people want new tech is because they feel that the extended use of technology is destroying kids ability to read and write.
    3. The allusion is used to show that if multimedia is truly eliminating writing then it should be stopped.
    4. The article shows that reading can improve your thought process and the ability to critically think. I agree with this since I find that when I read, I am able to create new ideas and thoughts about the book I wouldn't normally have thought of by just reading sparknotes. I am also able to remember specific events during the book with more clarity by reading.
    5. This moment in history will be seen as the tech based society. I believe that technology is meant to relax our brains because that was the reason for creating tools or technology. People's purpose for creating technology is to help make their life "easier".

    Paul Hurd P.6

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  70. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  71. 1. “Let me also be clear: I am not against teaching with multimedia, and on many occasions I require my students to create a number of such artifacts. But let us not discard print completely in favor of audio, visual, and/or audiovisual creations.”
    2. I think that the media so eagerly concludes that reading books is dead and young people all want new tech (with chips) instead of old tech (with papers) is because the world today is full of new technologies. Media would think young people want new things to educate themselves. Also, these days, people are so attached to electronic devices, smart phones, tablets, iPods, and etc., they less likely read actual writings on the papers.
    3. In Ulysses the phrase "stop the sea" is used as an expression for what is almost impossible. It is used in this article to say that technology will take over it’s useless to try and stop it.
    4. Reading makes us to think differently about almost anything. It gives you knowledge. The article states that reading is important in many ways to help develop our brain and thought process by making us think in new ways and even by provoking and leading to conversations with other people. It helps us with socializing with others and helps us on our level of thinking and processing your thoughts. I agree because the reading does give you something to learn and it helps you to develop your skills in writing.
    5. I think that this moment in history will be remembered as mainly about technologies, how they are improving each day and how people use them in their everyday life. I think this technology stuff would not stop but keep on advancing every moment in our future. People would eventually forget about books or any other works that are on papers.

    Yunjoo Period 6

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  72. 1. Burkdall's thesis is that although he incorporates the use of multimedia in his classes with his students he believes we should also be taught about writing along with multimedia.
    2. I believe that the media so eagerly believes that reading books is dead because let's face it, our generation is the generation of technology. I guess it's only fair to assume that our generation is saying good bye to the book and hello to e-readers.
    3. The allusion of Ulysses is there to make a point. It is there to say that technology is taking over everything, but we need to stop it from taking away reading books and writing.
    4. The article stated that reading prompts the reader to think for himself. I don't know how much I agree with this statement, but I agree that reading is important. I think that reading can either make someone think for himself, or it can make them take the author's opinion as truth and merely leave it at that.
    5. I think that this moment will be remembered as the transition to technology in literature. Yes, we do have e-readers, but we still have plenty of people who read books. I think that our reliance on tools is causing us to relax to much and sending our brains to to the point of atrophy. I know that when I was little I didn't particularly like math, but I made myself work out the problems. Now I just type the problem into a calculator depending on the amount of work I would have to do in order to solve it myself.

    Nancy Rubio
    Per. 2

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  73. 1)Burkdall's thesis is quoted here: "Let me also be clear: I am not against teaching with multimedia, and on many occasions I require my students to create a number of such artifacts. But let us not discard print completely in favor of audio, visual, and/or audiovisual creations. As Jonathan Swift suggested centuries ago in his novel Gulliver's Travels (1726), a concrete language is not enough. At the Academy of Lagado, Gulliver observes scholars carrying bags of objects to avoid the ambiguity of words, yet for abstract thought and expression, humans need the suppleness of meaning that only words afford. And we need certain conditions to appreciate or create such subtleties."

    2)The media concludes that reading books is dead and young people want new technologies instead of old ones because that's human nature. To go back way far, who would want to light a fire with rocks? It's time consuming and frustrating. However, as time progressed and new technology advanced, one click was all it took to light a fire. Many people believe that technology is more convenient to the actual resources because all the answers are obtainable without doing much work.

    3)The allusion to Ulysses "stop the sea" is saying that since technology has advanced so much during this time period, it will continue to do so and eventually take over reading and writing.

    4)Through reading comes knowledge. The article states "reading should be an 'incitement,'a unique means of prompting the reader to, in the strongest sense of the phrase, 'think for himself'". When we read, we aren't just reading it for the pleasure, but to gain more knowledge about life. With the books we read, we incorporate the ideas to our minds and put it into use in our everyday lives. I agree because humans are influenced by the things they see and hear.

    5)This moment in history will be remembered as the "Birth of Mass Technological Advancements" because Dr. Preston mentioned that our generation has the most access to technologies than any other generations in the past. I believe that technology will support intellectual development to a certain point in life and eventually lead us to the point of atrophy.

    Samuel Moon
    Period 6

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  74. 1.Burkdall's thesis is that writing and multimedia should be taught to the children when they are young and that there is no reason that we cannot have both.
    2. In our generation, every few months a new and updated version of each device is released. We are constantly wanting the "new and improved." Our youth likes and "needs" what ever device makes things easier and isn't as much effort. Even things as simple as turning a page has become a "waste of time", even though it is the same concept as pushing a button. The use of books will most likely be dead in within the next few generations.
    3. The author keeps referring to Ulysses in order to show that we need to stop using all of these new technologies so that we can preserve the use of the book and keep that original resource alive.
    4. The article clarifies that reading gives the audience a closer connection to a sense of thoughts and ideas. Reading creates ideas and we wouldn't have our fancy techno resources without the original books that created those ideas.
    5. This time in history will probably be remembered as a time of advanced modernism. In our era, that is all that seems to be evolving is that devices can basically contain our lives in them. As the creators intellects are increasing, the users brain power may be decreasing because the younger generations barely even have to think for themselves anymore. Technology does allow us to advance to the future, but it only allows us to become lazy toward our pursuit of knowledge.
    Sarah Rayburn period 3

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