Thursday, October 20, 2011

Tools That Change the Way We Think

Please read the following passage and respond to the questions below. Write your answers as a comment to this post. Then, cut/paste both the passage and your thoughts to your own blog in a post entitled, "Tools That Change the Way We Think."

"Back in 2004, I asked [Google founders] Page and Brin what they saw as the future of Google search. 'It will be included in people's brains,' said Page. 'When you think about something and don't really know much about it, you will automatically get information.'

'That's true,' said Brin. 'Ultimately I view Google as a way to augment your brain with the knowledge of the world. Right now you go into your computer and type a phrase, but you can imagine that it could be easier in the future, that you can have just devices you talk into, or you can have computers that pay attention to what's going on around them and suggest useful information.'

'Somebody introduces themselves to you, and your watch goes to your web page,' said Page. 'Or if you met this person two years ago, this is what they said to you... Eventually you'll have the implant, where if you think about a fact, it will just tell you the answer."

-From In the Plex by Steven Levy (p.67)


Answer this not-so-simple question: How does extensive Internet/media/technology use change the way you think? Focus on your memory, your ability to concentrate, your sense of time and priorities, and the subjects/topics that interest you most. If you find "thinking about your thinking" difficult to assess, try the following strategies: compare yourself with older people who did most of their formal learning before smart phones and 2.0 existed; compare yourself with contemporaries who don't use those tools much today; read up on what education leaders and thinkers have to say about generational differences in thinking (and remember to cite your sources).

83 comments:

  1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  2. The extensive Internet/media/technology use makes me feel lazier compared to how I was before. Whenever I have an interesting topic that I want to learn more about, I just go on Google and look at the first few links and read a few of them. I never actually feel like I’m absorbing the information that I’m reading which is unfortunate. I do that I suppose because I know that if I ever forget that information I could easily get back online and search for it again.
    In a way I feel ashamed that I’m taking advantage of the tools we use today. I’m taking advantage of myself. I’m not challenging myself the way I want to be, or at least challenging myself the way I used to want.
    With all of this I find myself fighting to remain the way I was regarding books and other activities (excluding the internet/technology). I am completely aware (and always have been) of the shift I had from reading long pieces of literature and studying to depending on the internet for a lot of my information.
    Also, learning all about filter bubbles makes me feel uneasy again. Yes, we are advancing in technology and using awesome algorithms that help us weed out what we might not want to read, but it’s also hindering us from moving forward. Because I am progressive I’m only shown those views, but part of learning and being educated is knowing all sides of every story. I absolutely hate that I’m not being treated like an adult. I hate that the tools that filter out other ideas make me feel like a child.
    I find myself longing for a storm to come to knock out the power so I’m forced to sit down and read, that is no metaphor. The one thing I’m proud of though is the fact that I acknowledge how much I use these tools, and that if I need to or want to, I can walk away from it. I have my priorities in check and I know what I need to be doing - most of the time.

    -Cody Kiniry

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  3. Extensive Internet, media, technology, etc. and reading this article has made me realize that although I have learned so much more than I would have been able to without technology, I think that technology makes it so that we have to think so much less. Like said in this article, answers appear before us when we use tools such as Google and the Internet, so we don't have to concentrate and think. Junior year, there were a few times I could only do my physics homework when there were step by step instructions online with problems identical or have a difference only in the numbers. I use this example because although I was already confused in the first place and that's why I was on the site, I didn't have to think much to solve the problem. I don't think technology has necessarily hurt my memory or ability to concentrate in class, but at home it is a distracting factor. It is strange how simple it is for us to find information these days by using such complex tool that very little understand. Therefore, it has indeed made us have to critically think less because of how little we are challenged when the answer to basically everything is on Google.

    Dania Hatamleh, Period Four

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  4. With all these new advances in media, the Internet, and technology, it can be a little overwhelming at times. But personally, I feel like these discoveries are dumbing me down. I only care about finding the right answer quickly---not the excitement or determination in searching for these results. When Google fills in my search bar with what I wanted to find, sure, it's more efficient and useful. But it also causes me not to care about what they may put in front of me. I don't take the time now to sift through various sites. I choose the first couple that are on the top of the list (which might not even be relevant to my question/search). Depending on technology has no depth to it; it gives you the information it thinks you would like to hear and nothing beyond that. Not only have filter bubbles made me lazier, but the option to have multiple Internet tabs up or have unlimited access to sites make me procrastinate. One click away from doing something important can lead me to a new site that takes me somewhere else and there goes an hour from my work. I can't concentrate on what needs to get done because I could go to a completely different link for something irrelevant.
    It's hard to imagine how people got along without Google or iPads. Of course, I know they used books and other news outlets for their resources but compared to now, they must have had some sort of driven attitude to get them where they needed to go. Researchers must have felt the need to hunt for the latest discovery where as now, kids can unconsciously look stuff up on their iPhone in about 30 seconds. Thinking about thinking was the norm because that was the way people learned anything they needed to. There had to be great effort to look up facts or know what was going on in the world.
    I wonder what it would be like if, right now, technology and media came to a halt. What would this new generation be like if we depended on print newspapers for the latest news in the world? Or if we didn't have all of the Internet's info in the palm of our hand? Maybe it would bring us back to a more intellectual and active time. After this article and watching the video, I want to go out and look beyond what is given in front of me. I want to balance what's important over irrelevant and find what actually matters that I can't see.

    -Kelly Brickey, Period 3

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  5. By using extensive Internet/media/technology it makes think about how it caused less of a motivation for me to actually learn about something. When I use the computer and different websites to look up something it doesn’t actually stick to my memory. I just look up the topic and in just a matter of seconds answers pop up for me. This media also messes up my concentration. Sure like any other person, there are times when people are doing research on a homework assignment and think to themselves “I’ll just check my messages really quick no big deal” but in reality it distracts us from trying to get homework done. Then time is running out, so people just look up something really quick and find the easiest answers they can get. From this distraction of loses our concentration, it has made it harder for people to actually get something out of their research. These kind of things have made us lazy on wanting to learn about something we have never known before. By learning about the filter bubbles it makes me feel like when I am doing research, I am not learning everything I am supposed to know. Since the filter bubbles limit me from certain information because they “think” they are giving me what I want, I feel like there is a lot more information out there that I should know of. When comparing myself to older people without smart phones or contemporaries who don’t use the tools we use today, shows how much easier it has gotten for everyone. With just typing in a certain topic we receive many answers that they would not have gotten back then.

    Jessica Manriquez; Per. 6

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  6. The extensive use of interet/media/technology can be a positive effect or a negative effect depending on the way you use technology etc. Having such toys like the cell phone or the internet connection helps us facilitate communicate to one another.We can be on the whole opposite side of the world and still know what is happening on the other side. These things are positve outcomes that can help prevent accidents or just that plain inform us of politics and such things.The use of technology has helped me improve and learn many knew things that would have probably taken me months to find out without the use of the internet. As well as being able to reach out to my family members who live outside the country and can't have the pleasure of seeing them. Knowing what is happening in the world is important because it keeps us up to date and since we live in a community in which we always want to be informed an up to date. However, such use has caused students and others to become lazier in doing their schoolwork or instead of meetimg someone face to face the choose such things as facebook, their cell phone or an email. Yes, it can be ok to communicate in such ways but what valuable skills are we loosing? Are we creating less socially active students who's world revolves around technology? What harm are we causing students in instituting the use of tecnology all the time? Are students being spoon feed into facilitating their lifestyles by the use of technology? I find it difficult to balance my use of technology im always on my fone and I've noticed that my grades have been affected byy my use of the fone. As well as the communication that I have with my family because I spend less and less time with them.

    Edith Gonzalez
    p.3

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  7. The extensive use of Internet/media/technology has had both a negative and positive impact on me. Although I am learning a lot of new information faster, I feel like it is actually dumbing me down. I feel lazier and more dependent on technology. When I want to figure something out or learn about a new topic I usually just go on Google and read the first few links. It takes the challenge and fun out of searching for your answer for a long time. Before all this new technology came into my life I was more concentrated and focused. It’s a lot more difficult for me to stay focused on my work because either I’m listening to my IPod, texting someone, or checking my Facebook. There is so much more distractions. Even though I have all this overwhelming information I still feel like I’m not learning much. It’s so easy to find the answers that moments after reading them, I typically forget them. They aren’t engraved into my schemata. I kind of wish we didn’t have so much technology/media for a while just to see how much more or less we would actually learn.
    Lupita Perez Per. 3

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  8. Technology has probably made me lazier. Why think when the answers are one click away? It is hard to imagine a world where books were our only resource. Although the internet exposes us to a great deal of information, it’s doubtful that we actually retain all of this knowledge. Dictionary.com’s “Word of the Day” is a perfect example of how we have great resources online, but fail to utilize them. I check the word of the day almost every day, but I couldn’t tell you what yesterday’s word is, because I have already forgotten. The internet is also very distracting. Sometime I have to hide my favorite bar so I stop clicking on links other than the blog. But the distractions don’t end there. RSS feeds and advertisements are still there to make me lose my focus. Even though it is hard to tell, homework is my priority. (Initially) It doesn’t take much to get side tracked though. Sure, Hamlet is interesting, but there is a world of endless links that keep me distracted for hours at a time.

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  9. I have noticed that by using extensive internet, media,and technology it has really impacted the way I think. I'm more interested in getting the quick facts rather the whole background information. In a matter of seconds, I have the information I need, and I don't feel the need to look any further or dig deeper to confirm if the facts are true. I am willing to admit that my concentration is repeatedly broken. I am focused on a researching task, but then a new tab is opened, and suddenly I find my attention focused else where. Whether it be Facebook, Tumblr, or Youtube, my attention is there rather getting the information. With these daily distractions, researching is getting harder for people to do. It is becoming a bothersome thing, and something they aren't willing to spend time on. It's unfortunate that it had come to this, but its something we all struggle with.
    Miranda Perez 3rd period

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  10. The extensive use of internet/media/technology has made me lazier and less interested in the topic that I'm trying to research about. It's no longer a challenge for me to find the answer, to look it up in a book and read it on paper. Instead I'll just click on the first couple links I see, stare at the screen for a bit and get the most vital information I need. However, if something does spark my attention it's easier for me to jump site to site and absorb everything. Comparing myself to older people, even though I said I've become lazier I still believe that I know more information than my parents(for example) because I know how to use the internet and find out things that are going on around the world that are real and raw and actually happening. And are not being watered down by the media. Technology has helped us advance immensely, we just need to learn how to break out of our filter bubbles. Learning about duckduckgo.com, boolify.org, and dogpile.com are great ways to separate yourself from algorithms. I think that I will be more advanced in these areas by the end of semester just by learning in this class.
    Period 3

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  11. "5% think, 10% think they think, 85% would rather die than think."

    Just a somewhat funny quote I found online that caught my attention. It’s sad to say that only 5% of the people actually think while the other 10% think they think. Laughing out loud? Yes.

    How does extensive internet or media change the way I think? I’m not exactly sure how it changes the way I personally think. Technology makes me somewhat unproductive and perhaps habitually lazy. It sure makes me distracted and makes me waste valuable time by logging onto my others accounts… anyway, concentration is definitely a key point to this—with all sorts of tabs and gadgets or widgets on a computer, it’s almost impossible not to get distracted while trying to actually do something productive. Thinking about my thinking, right? I know how to manage my time and I do know the subjects and topics that interest me, of course... I’m getting distracted by just typing up this comment. iTunes, Facebook and YouTube are just a click away.
    I read a pretty interesting article how people literally, “cut and paste”, I mean, with scissors and glue when they wanted to copy something. The article also gave me some historical background about the first computer that was invented 400 years ago which was more bulky than a typewriter and could calculate up to six digit numbers. It’s fascinating to understand and see how much technology has improved and how people decades ago dealt with minimal information. I don' t think it's possible for our generation to not go a day without some kind of technology. Some of us "freak" out if we don't have our phones with us. It's amazing how big of a difference technology can make to our daily lives...
    http://gulfnews.com/news/world/other-world/that-simple-life-before-computers-came-along-1.112948
    http://www.irfi.org/articles/articles_101_150/critical_thinking.htm

    mari kagawaaa
    period III

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  12. I've found that extensive use of internet, media and technology have made me lazy and distracted. Not only am I distracted by text messages and facebook, but also music. I have Itunes running at all times and tend to put on music which is very distracting. I zone out very easily. For example, right now I am on my laptop, playing music, with facebook on the next tab and a muted tv right in front of me. This is where I start getting lazy. With all these distractions it makes it hard for me to do my work because I know I can be doing so many other things which are more fun. I start rushing my work because of the amount of other things I could be doing. My parents always say I have it easy because if I need an answer it's always a click away and they didn't have that advantage when they were kids. I think it's a disadvantage because yes we have all the answers to our homework available on the internet, but we also have to deal with all the distractions that technology brings.


    (No sources to cite, I just used personal examples)

    Nathan Seidenberg
    P. 3

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  13. The evolution of technology has definitely made our generation a ot more lazy. We rely on the internet to give us answers instead of the newspaper or books from the library. When my parents are grandparents were kids, they relied strongly on the newspaper, and going to the library and doing physical research. Now, the internet has evolved so immensely that we have created filter bubbles without even realizing it. We only see what the computer thinks we want to see. Some people think this is affecting people in their workplace even. We rely on the information our computer right in front of us is giving us, not realizing that we are not seeing every piece of information we could see. We really need to make sure we arent just stopping our research right at our first keyword serach on Google.
    http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm

    Period 3 Tori Thompson

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  14. Internet, media and technology have made me very lazy. For example on a homework problem, instead of searching for it in the book, all I do is search for it on the internet. It's faster and easier. Sometimes I feel bad that it comes so easy for us teenages today to find the answer to the question, compared to when my parents were teenagers.Also, technology and media distracts me from the more important things of the day. When I'm doing homework I am usually listeninng to music and on Facebook. Sometimes I get very distracted and forget to even finish my hoemwork that I had already started. The internet and other technology have advantages and disadvantages. Its eaier to find answers, but it will never help us.

    Patrick Sims P.3

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  15. With all of the new advancements in media, technology, and the internet I have discovered that it is a lot more tempting to take the easy way out or the lazy rout when it comes to getting answers. Rather than trying to think my way through a problem or trying to truely research something down to the finer points, I choose to type the first three letters of a word that is meaningful to my search and then let the media, technology, and internet do the rest. It is way faster and much more simple to accomplish a search that way. The truth is that I had no idea that doing things that way was only giveing me a small percent of the whole. Now that I know how the concept of a filter bubble works I feel that it is important to inform my self of all the information that is truely their.

    A.J. Franklin
    Period 2

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  16. "5% think, 10% think they think, 85% would rather die than think."
    Just a somewhat funny quote I found online that caught my attention. It’s sad to say that only 5% of the people actually think while the other 10% think they think. Laughing out loud? Yes.
    How does extensive internet or media change the way I think? I’m not exactly sure how it changes the way I personally think. Technology makes me somewhat unproductive and perhaps habitually lazy. It sure makes me distracted and makes me waste valuable time by logging onto my others accounts… anyway, concentration is definitely a key point to this—with all sorts of tabs and gadgets or widgets on a computer, it’s almost impossible not to get distracted while trying to actually do something productive. Thinking about my thinking, right? I know how to manage my time and I do know the subjects and topics that interest me, of course... I’m getting distracted by just typing up this comment. iTunes, Facebook and YouTube are just a click away.
    I read a pretty interesting article how people literally, “cut and paste”, I mean, with scissors and glue when they wanted to copy something. The article also gave me some historical background about the first computer that was invented 400 years ago which was more bulky than a typewriter and could calculate up to six digit numbers. It’s fascinating to understand and see how much technology has improved and how people decades ago dealt with minimal information.
    http://gulfnews.com/news/world/other-world/that-simple-life-before-computers-came-along-1.112948
    http://www.irfi.org/articles/articles_101_150/critical_thinking.htm

    mari kagawa
    period iii

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  17. I have found that the extensive media/internet/technology is just the easy way out for most of us. Nowadays, like it says on the passage, Google or mostly any other site can just give you your answer in an instant and that's what most people go to when they are too lazy to think. Media/internet/technology has pretty much taken over our thinking and is now what we usually depend on. Sometimes I can say that I actually find it difficult to think for myself when I'm shut off from the internet. Now, I don't really challenge myself, I just let the internet do the work for me. Also, it's really difficult to actually learn about what you're supposed to if the internet/media/technology is giving you the answer... Yes you'll get the answer right but most likely it will not stick to your head. I guess this could be something that we can't avoid no matter how hard we try just because of the fact that it's everywhere now and it's mostly what we depend on.

    Marisol Zepeda
    Period 6

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  18. The first thing I thought of when I read "Eventually you'll have the implant, where if you think about a fact, it will just tell you the answer." is how easy tests will be, the next thing was that if this happens no one who has this implant will ever have to try to think for themselves ever again, which can be very bad.

    Extensive use of technology can make use lazier, or more efficient depending on how you use it. For me it is a little of both. When doing my homework I sometime get distracted from it because I am looking at something else and forget about the homework. However, I can also get work done faster because I have the internet right there and don't have to look up the answers in a book. Lastly, I have to say I am more connected to the world because of the internet. (I didn't use any sources.)

    Carson Dacus P.6

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  19. Extensive use of technology in my mind doesn’t make you lazier. It’s more of a matter of convenience than a matter of interest. It would be illogical to skim through an encyclopedia when you can open the internet and after a search find the exact information if not more. This can make it more difficult to concentrate on something just because of the fact that in the back of your mind you see it as a waste of time to do it another way. It’s all a matter of how you use the tools that are given to you; people who get sidetracked whilst using the internet and technology probably would get more distracted if they had to do the same task at the library. The role of technology is to take something and refine it so that is becomes easier or more convenient and that is exactly what is happening here. While it may not always be the best information it is quick and easy to get. Now instead of having to look through the archives of a library to find obscure information about topics we don’t know much about, you can use your phone and the information you need, easier and faster. The only negative I can think of is that on the internet there are lots of articles where people interpret and give their opinion; instead of you reading the information and creating an opinion of your own. In that sense the internet does create an environment where thinking isn’t necessary, but also gives you an opportunity to look at something and understand where and when someone has put their opinions and ideas into the facts.

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  20. When talking of technology of the future, such as the “implant” mentioned in the article above, I begin to wonder how much of it is invasive or too powerful. I wonder how people will deal with technology that extensive, considering people are already suffering from “information overload” in the safety of their own brains. The act of “thinking about your thinking” is familiar to many of us, yet it could be seen as a state of confusion, and lack of being clear minded.
    By comparing myself to older people who did not experience smart phones and 2.0 while growing up, I believe that we learn at the same speed, considering we are all human beings. Of course now we are given more information on the world around us, I do not believe that we have a greater capacity to learn, but I do believe that the average kid is introduced to much more information. Whether they choose to use their resources and exercise their brain is the individual’s decision.

    http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0HUL/is_5_32/ai_112686945/
    The above link goes to an article called “managing generational differences: school leaders who recognize different needs of baby boomers and generation X’ers can create an organization where all employees are working from their strengths” by Andrew Ansoorian, Pamela Good, Dave Samuelson. Althogh I am neither a part of the baby boomers or generation x, this article is helpful because it describes why there are differences. The reason is that there was a different mood when they grew up, they were influenced by world events, what technology was available, and what movements happened when they grew up.

    Rebecca Patterson Perod 6

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  21. The extensive use of Internet/media/technology makes it easier for me to get information.  It's quick and efficient,  to just go on Google to look up whatever I want to research.  I can't really imagine how long it must have taken people to do things like research papers, when they didn't have these sources.  It must have taken a long time, but they were probably learning more going through all the information.  Now since it is so fast and easy, I might not learn as much.  Also from what I learned about the filter bubbles, I really am not learning everything when I do a search on Google. They are blocking me off from the other side, which can really be beneficial in learning the facts.  I also don't really need to remember much because anything I won't to know takes about 5 minutes, at the most, to figure out. When there was no extensive use in Internet and these other sources, people had to remember more information to save them the time of looking it up again.  All of the use of the Internet just makes me feel I don't need to learn much,  and depend on these other sources when I need to know something. 

    Hunter Walker
    Period 3

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  22. Internet/media/technology use has made it easier for me to obtain the gist of a topic rather than searching in depth. Routinely, this has made me lazier, lazier, and lazier. It's just that Internet allows me to save time by getting the information in an instant rather than going to the library and search through the books. However, what I am beginning to realize is that modern people are indifferent to education than older people who learned in the formal way. Back then, there were no websites that summarized books or calculators to solve a problem. They had to actually spend hours and hours of time devoting to their assignments. I, on the other hand, can read from a book, but if the deadline for a book report is coming up and I didn't even read a page from my book, then I can go online and search for a summary and get the job done in an instant. It's that simple. Using Internet this way is beneficial in the short run, but detrimental in the long run. The major difference between them and us (as in modern kids) is that they actually wanted to learn and were dedicated to their work. We, on the other hand, give up if things get too complicated and try to find an easier way to access information quickly.

    Samuel Moon
    Period 6

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  23. The internet/media/technology only changes the way I think in a very minimal way. I do not look for information on the internet unless it is used for a school assignment. I know that the internet is a vast sea of information which was created by a multitude of informed and uninformed minds. I know for a fact that I will probably “short out” by trying to absorb so much information so I naturally lean away from using online sources to learn. Plus I can never fully know what I want to know until I run past something in life that strikes my interest and start asking myself and others present if they are around. I use life as a learning experience and my ability to concentrate and memory solely are dependant on that drive to search out an answer. Since there are no real features online that advertise knowledge about particular subjects, my curiosity is next to none when it comes to surfing the web for answers that I don’t have the questions for. I do not trust the internet with subjects that interest me too much because I keep finding advertisement everywhere for various things related to that subject in particular. There’s just nothing like reading a book or article about psychology or philosophy and not have some pseudo scientific ad flash in the corner of the page as a “sponsor” and makes you question the very integrity of the article. I see the internet as very manipulative and being lazy on the internet, I do not like having to check 5 articles to make sure one point out of five in a given article is correct. It is much harder to print erroneous information in books.My sense of time and priorities get really messed up online or even on the computer. There are so many ways of distraction that unless I sit down on the computer with a mission to get something done that I lose my focus and sense of priority within a matter of minutes by either looking up Facebook or playing a game. I need the mentor aspect or the feel that I have knowledge in my hands when reading a book and that it is up to me to unlock the knowledge within. I will never be able to let go of books. I see books as a way to learn and the computer as a way to blow off steam and relax and I dare not attempt to change it. I will admit, I love the technology of word processors that aspect of technology has been able to truly convey the ideas of my mind and let them be viewed by the world at large. In that sense technology has given depth and complexity to my thoughts because I can attempt to use words I typically wouldn’t use and look them up really quickly to make sure I used the word correctly.

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  24. Growing up with Internet, Media, and Technology and witnessing it develop, has made me realize that information was difficult to get when these advances in technology didn’t exist. When information started becoming much more easily accessible on the internet, it became really popular. I know for sure this pulled me away from things that I loved to do, like drawing and reading, but it also makes us really smart because we can get more information faster and knowing that this information is right at our fingertips is pretty damn cool.
    Something about “filter bubbles” makes me feel restricted. I feel like if I wanted to broaden my knowledge or learn something new, I wouldn't be able to, because Google filters a lot of things out and I wouldn’t get some sources out there filled with useful information.

    Daniel Gonzalez

    per.2

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  25. The extensive use of the internet and other technologies around the world has greatly affected the way we think these days. We no longer take time to critically think about situations or sit and contemplate about issues in the world. We now get answers to everything with a click of a button. We rely on the internet and other browsers for answers. In a way you can say that the internet has taken over our mind. We rely on information that is given to us by others and we don’t stop and think if the information is correct or even look at the flaws in the information given to us. We tend to just read the information and believe it is true; everyone has done this at some point. A couple years ago people would have to memorize a lot of things but now we don’t even bother with memorization, we just choose to look it up when it is needed. We can no longer concentrate for long periods of times nor do we have patients because we are use to everything coming at us so quickly that we can no longer bear to wait. We try to do a lot more in one day than most would do in a couple of days back then since we have information coming at us so quickly. Since the information comes so fast we do not have time to process it all thoroughly and we loose opportunities to learn. It is funny to think that back then when someone was interested in a certain topic they would get out there and experience it personally and learn about it by actively participating in it but now we look up the things we are interested in. Say we are interested in football, back then people would go out there play the game and watch the game be played but now we watch it on television or look it up on the web. Schooling back in the day was also different, they would learn straight out of the book or from what the teacher said, they would not have the opportunities to share ideas on blogs or to do much research. All their research came from books. Don’t get me wrong, the internet has provided a lot of opportunities for us. It has helped this world advance and get to the great stage it is in today. The only problem is that people do not tend to use it in an affective way; we use it as a way to make things more simple for ourselves and save time. If we would learn how to use it effectively and learn how to be one step ahead of the internet it would make this society function in a more productive way.

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  26. I think that the use of the internet/media/technology has gradually decreased my ability to critically think. Instead of getting an essay topic or a homework assignment that I have to sit down and really work on, I can most likely get the answer within minutes with the use of the internet. The entire thinking process of researching has declined because of the convenience of technology. It's extremely rare for people to go to the library to check out books to find information for a project their working on, just because this is so much more time consuming. With the mind-set that research won't take long, I usually have a difficult time concentrating and end up browsing other websites while I'm trying to complete my school assignments. What could have been a quick assignment, can take me an hour with the distractions of the internet. The internet contains a lot of biased information, and like from the filter bubbles reading, the information you find on hear is tailored to what the internet servers believe you want to hear. With this in mind, I think that those who don't use technology as much are able to think more on their own, as they are more likely to find more of a variety of information by using all of the resources available to them.

    Arianna Farmer
    Period 2

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  27. The extensive use of technology of today’s era makes our society as a whole lazier. We don’t challenge ourselves as we would if technology was more of a rarity. As a high school student most of us on some assignments can slack off and use the internet as a quick out to get a good grade. It’s easy to type something into Google, read the first few links and get what you need within a few minutes. But with that said some sights provide incorrect information or can be accessible to the public giving people access to alter the information. Technology leaves more room for procrastination because now everything is about getting something done in efficient time, why drag out the research process when technology cuts down the time immensely. If technology disappeared I honestly don’t think this generation would really know what to do with themselves. It provides thousands of distractions such as Face book , which is a way of how teens now connect with others and makes communication easier just as text messaging has also done.
    Per.4

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  29. The extensive use of Internet/media/technology makes everyone a little bit lazier. People often take for granted the internet and other technologies used for finding out information. People do not put much thought into what they are trying to find out, they just think "i can just search it on the internet and it will not take more then 5 minutes." Although the internet is a very fast, easy and efficient source to get your information from it does not require much work. Back in the day when my mom was in high school she used what seem like ancient methods of finding information, like a dictionary or encyclopedia. Many kids in this day and age have yet to even pick up an encyclopedia let alone use it. I feel that with such an efficient way of getting information we often as human beings become very lazy and dependent on such a reliable source.

    Max Kuhlman
    period 2

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  30. What I took from this article in regards to media/internet/technology is that the more you “rely” on these tools, the less you use your own brain to search out answers for yourself. Think of the brain as a muscle. What happens if you don’t use it regularly? You’ll lose it. By relying to this sort of “think-for-you” technology, that’s what happens; you get comfortable letting the computer think for you and conduct your research for you that you become idle. With the vast, ever expanding landscape of 2.0 so easily accessible, I feel like the opportunity to gather more knowledge is there, but with the existence and almost religious use of “think-for-you” technology the application of that knowledge is lower than ever. I think our real goal should be to find the balance between the two ideas, doing this would allow us to operate in the highest, most honest expression of what the information out there has to offer.

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  31. With today's evolution of Internet, media, and technology it’s completely changed how we interact, learn, and communicate, and many other things. With multiple search engines on the internet, it makes research easier with one click away, literally. On the internet within one search engine it results in hundreds of resources and websites for your answer. Whereas my parents did it what we now call “old school” where they would pick up an encyclopedia or book, which is still used today, but what seems less often if you have access to a computer. With smartphones, which has completely turned communication into a whirlwind, itr helps you research on the go, interact with friends, and helps guide you to where your going with GPS. In my parents’ day, they had to use a pay phone or house phone to communicate or carry a map or ask for directions. Tools like these don’t make us lazy but provides us with extra time and useful resources. Yes, I suppose google “thinks” for us as we just browse at the top sites of our search, but at the same time we’d be looking up the same information in a book.It’s the same learning process just more advanced. We could learn maybe about 50 new things over the internet with one search, on different websites in a half hour, whereas if we checked out books and then scroll through each one to find the answers we were looking for might have taken a few hours. Most kids in today's generation say 'i don't know what'd I do without my phone or computer.' This leads into what some call technology a form of being "lazy" because when you take away all the advancements of technology, our generation is stuck because were used to having a quick answer in less than 10 minutes and were left with struggling to find an answer through an encyclopedia or hold a conversation over the phone without texting. Though distractions interfere with the ability to concentrate while using these devices, even now as I’m writing my comment I have two other windows open with facebook and youtube. Same with a smarphone, somehow I always end up on facebook when I have use of internet access.

    Alaysia Navarro Period 4

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  32. Internet/media/technology uses have made my life a lot easier. I cannot lie, I use the internet more often than I read a book, or even a newspaper. I go to the internet for every question I have, and get any information I need there. When an assignment comes up that asks me to think for myself, it's so hard to not go sit in front of a computer and let my Mac do the work for me. Having said that, I think that technology has made people extremely lazy. I find myself getting more fatigued than I used to when it comes to simple assignments. Why would I want to think for myself when I have a personal robot willing to do the work for free?

    There is a value in a person's own sentimental thoughts. Our minds are so wrapped around media and technology that the brain has had a chance to kick back and watch. When I talk to my grandma about something, she always talks from her own mind, and the difference between her opinions and thoughts and mine are completely different. She doesn't even think to go to a computer for an answer, because she wasn't raised in the middle of a technological revolution. There is something to be said about older generations and their ideas, they are organic and unfiltered. I feel like my opinions and the way I operate is mainly credited to cyberspace.

    I am glad we are getting a chance to study this because it gives me a chance to think for myself, for once! I did this whole thing without even opening another browser...even Facebook! I am proud of myself and I hope I can develop a habit to think for myself without going to Google or Bing for all of my answers.

    Kaley Jorgensen
    Period 2

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  33. The extensive use Internet/media/technology changes the way we think by enabling us to hardly think at all. For instance, I know that having access to the internet and other technological resources are obviously more accessible and convenient. But also make me more indolent. Because everything is already programmed, I don’t really need to think twice about it or worrying about dealing with the constant frustration of manually having to look up and research everything we ever wanted to know.
    The current explosion of digital technology not only is changing the way we live and communicate but also is rapidly and profoundly altering our brains. It’s getting harder and harder to imagine life without it. It has given us instant access to vast amounts of information, and we’re able to stay in touch with friends and colleagues more or less. When we’re constantly distracted and interrupted, as we tend to be when looking at the screens of our computers and mobile phones, our brains can’t to forge the strong connections that give distinctiveness and depth to our thinking. Our thoughts tend to become disjointed and our memories weaken.
    Growing body of scientific evidence suggests “the net, with its constant distractions and interruptions, is turning us into scattered and superficial thinkers.” And this is morally true. The more we use internet/ technology the less we tend to physically think because we’re having all the work programmed for us.
    “We rely on the Internet and digital technology for entertainment, political discussion, and communication with friends and co-workers. As the brain evolves and shifts its focus toward new technological skills, it drifts away from fundamental social skills, such as reading facial expressions during conversation or grasping the emotional context of a subtle gesture.” It states the more we become equipped, engaged with technology, the farther away we drift from “reality” in a sense. The tools we use to think with our information technologies (resources) shape and mold our habits of mind.

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/internet/7967894/How-the-Internet-is-making-us-stupid.html
    http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2010/aug/15/internet-brain-neuroscience-debate
    http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=your-ibrain

    Jolissa Jiles
    p.4

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  34. My memory isn't the best in the first place, but I don't think technology is helping with that. With information at the click of a button, who needs to remember things? I think media, technology, and the Internet are all devices trying to enforce human nature's laziness. Also, our short attention spans make it hard to concentrate even when we're really trying, the Internet with tabs and distracting things doesn't help with that. For me, even writing this response I got distracted and found it hard to even start. Time is a tricky subject it can slip away before we know it, or seem to drag on, with new technology we become distracted quicker and easily loose track of time, therefore our priorities become skewed because we think things won't take very long when usually they take longer than we think. I think that people are right to be against technology because it is forcing our free thinking to become, not what we think, but a collection of what we hear or see. We rely on the Internet as a reliable source but it could be false and we have nothing to proove it. I think people who didn't need technology are a lot smarter than we are because they used their minds to come up with creative thoughts and ideas, we take from what we hear, what we see, what others think. People without Internet relied on eachother to get information across so you directly new the source, it wasn't someone anonymous or some computer. Technology can be used in a good way to spread ideas and thoughts easily but it generally isn't.

    Taryn Kawahara period 2

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  35. The internet/media/technology have all influenced how I think. The internet has made it so quick and easy to find information. This factor has had an impact on my ability to focus, and manage my time effectively. For example, since the internet does not require me to focus for a long period of time to find information, it is becoming increasingly harder for me to concentrate in other aspects of my life. Also, the internet tends to ruin my sense of priorities because I know I will be able to go onto Google and find the answer I need in minutes. I know I do not need to manage my time because finding the answer will hardly take up any time. My parents did not have the internet, so they most likely have better developed their time management and ability to focus. While I'm finding answers in minutes, they had to search thoroughly through a book for quite some time. Which required both focus, as well as time management. The internet/media/technology is, in a way, hindering this generation from their full potential.

    Cayla Salazar Period 2

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  36. Extensive use of technology, media, and internet often changes our thinking for the worse, rather than expanding it. Both technology and the internet is full of potential, but I think that we don't always know how to use it successfully. I love the internet and I use it all the time, for an array of things. Yes, social network sites are often distracting but they can bring people together. Also, the internet has helped me get a lot of information. If I need help in any subject, I can start searching around and usually find something. For example, when I don't understand my physics homework, I research some of the topics, and often find practice problems and all the information I need. The other day I was in a conversation about how exactly cell phones work, and since no one was sure, we looked it up instantly and were able to learn something new. We have grown up with technology and so we are more easily able to adapt to it, whereas explaining cell phones or computers to my grandparents is more trouble than it's worth. I think that if we expand our use of the internet from the random, silly things to the more important, thought provoking things then our thinking will expand rather than contract.

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  37. It’s a hard thing to explain what happens in my thought process now but before when I didn’t have a computer it was a lot easier for me to think I had not so many thoughts going on at once which may just be because I’m growing up and taking on more responsibilities if not maybe have made me know a little more, makes my priorities and sense of time easier to manage because I have all these resources to help remind me of things that need to get done, and the things I’m interested by the most are easier to find but harder to concentrate on because there is so much going on.
    From just three of four articles I only found a single one that thought technology could help students with critical thinking others feel it has dumbed us down making us not want to read books. They take a very one-sided, conservative view of things making youth as a whole look as if we have no want or drive to better ourselves but rather to stay stuck in a hole filled with cow dung. As I read more articles and studies a study done by UCLA showed that the technology of a videogame helped how a laparoscopic surgeon would succeed in his procedures, it displaying fewer mistakes and a shorter procedure time. http://www.iste-community.org/forum/topics/is-technology-killing-critical an article posted by Andra Brichacek asking people to write an essay about what they thought of critical thinking and how technology is changing it. What I got was two perspectives what teachers wrote, well-informed, and what ignorant people thought of the subject a majority of teachers think school districts are crippling technology and not allowing the student to harbor the full effects of it while those ignorant people feel it just makes students less knowledgeable and unable to reason. There was also one article written eleven years ago that said policymakers needed to fund schools so that all students are able to get to the technology needed in order to fuel the learning process. This all leads me to believe that it is going to be a never ending battle between what people think and what is true with critical thinking and technology unless things all over the country happen in schools that fuels the use of technology and advancing the process of critical thinking through technology in all grade levels.
    Sites Used:
    - http://newsroom.ucla.edu/portal/ucla/is-technology-producing-a-decline-79127.aspx
    - http://www.iste-community.org/forum/topics/is-technology-killing-critical
    - http://www.ascd.org/publications/newsletters/policy-priorities/mar99/num16/toc.aspx
    - http://www.bestteachersinstitute.org/id98.html

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  38. Extensive Internet/media/technology use changes the way I think fo many reasons. I think that the more technology comes out or is improved the less we all make use our brains. We don't necessarly have to think for ourselves anymore becasue all around us there are things that do it for us. Technology not only affects the amount of thinking that I do but also the concentration level I have when trying to complete school work or other things of importance. I alway sget on the computer thinkin , "okay, I'm going to compkete my homework within an hour and be able to go to bed." Guess what? Doesn't happen, ever. I always get distracted with Facebook ot other interesting websites that have nothing to do with my homework.I think that it's not only the interenet but all technology in general becomes a waste of my time because I don't use the tools to learn and when I do, it's only to get a quick answer on something never to spend time actually learning something in depth. Older people who did their learning before smart phones and 2.0 existed are full of knowledge that I have at the tip of my fingertips and don't bother trying to learn about it. I have talked to elders ande even the way they speak sounds smarter. They actually had to use their brains to full capacity to learn things back in time because no computer or phone was there to do the thinking for them. People who don't use the technology there is today and actually care about the amount of knowledge they have and an education read a lot and have their time and priorities set in order and actually follow through because they dont put their focus on technology. I read an article titled, "Leadership by the New Generation" and it was interesting to see what leaders that are going to retirement are worried about. They say that today's generation is basically lazy and always looking for more "me time".
    "They want flexible hours, more vacation time, continuous training, and telecommuting options. They expect to leverage technology to work efficiently instead of staying late in the office to get it all done.", this is what article says today's genration's mind is on constantly and i completely agree because I've heard comments from people around my age or mid 20's complain about work and hardships in life when in reality what they go through is not much but they are just used to the easy life. technology may be used for good by some but for the majority of today's generation it is used for entertainnment and wasting time.

    Article URL: http://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/newLDR_59.htm

    -Marie Alvarado
    Per. 3

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  39. If there is one thing I am sick of hearing from adults criticizing my generation, its “instant gratification.” As much as I hate the phrase, there is still truth to it. It stems from constant internet use and the speed in which we can either pleasure ourselves or search something. What used to take hours to research by going to the city library, now takes seconds to find. And with this speed comes the need for something even faster. Google has taken this duty by making searches so easy and fast that the website will fill in your query for you without any effort. Say I want to research Herbert Hoover, the president. Without even having to finish the name, Google will have finished it for me. All I have to do is hit enter and scroll to the first link on the page. Another example of the shortening attention span of people is the Wadsworth Constant (http://knowyourmeme.com/memes/the-wadsworth-constant#.TqDyy7KyBXk). The constant states that, for almost every Youtube video out there, the first thirty percent can be skipped without any loss of information. The same can apply to almost everything from books to simple speech, making something similar to new speak; the horror, the horror. Youtube videos are already short to begin with. Skipping the first five seconds because you are too impatient to wait is the essence of “instant gratification,” although I do use this. How does this new generation of impatient brats armed with the knowledge of everything humanity has ever known compare to their parents or past generations? To start, it doesn’t just affect their actions over the internet, but also in real life. People have always been impatient. We’ve always wanted things faster. This can be seen in waiting in a grocery line. Just a wait of five minutes in a line, while some old lady in front of you scans her prune can seem like an eternity. Even the microwave, something that can cook foods at speed unimaginable 100 years ago can seem too slow. This state that we are in is a state of entropy. We have become slovenly through our own desires. Although we may have all the knowledge and technology in the world, it is that which will kill us. We are privy to our own desires.

    Nicholas Joshua Lycan
    Period 4

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  40. I believe that the internet has made our generation dependent on technology. But it has also helped us become more informed because of the convienence of the internet and search engines such as Google and DuckDuckGo. We have a world of information at our finger tips. Since the internet incldes social media such as facebook my concentration has gone way down. Its hard to focus on an essay when the internet tab is blinking with facebook updates. It was not that long ago when while writing a research paper included going to the library checking out a book and actually searching through it to find the information needed. Now we can read the link and know if we want to look further into reading it or move on to the next link. This has created a lazy and impatient generation.

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  41. Now a days it seems like I change topics really fast. It's not that I can't concentrate one thing, but I just get bored with only one subject for an extended period of time. I think that this might be a reflection of the way the internet allows you to have 5 different things going on at once. Facebook chat going on, music from iTunes or YouTube, researching information for school on Google, checking your mail, and Skyping with that family member in Texas. Doing one thing and one thing alone just isn't heard of anymore... My priorities have shifted too. Instead of focusing on the long term benefits of getting work done early, I focus on the short term rewards of procrastinating. (Maybe that's why I'm doing this assignment at 9:40) Back in the days when smart phones and internet didn't exist, you had to go about finding information in a much different way. You had to find someone who might know about the topic you had in mind or go to a library and look it up. Now it's only a few clicks away on your computer at home or on your phone in the middle of class. (Because God forbid you should ever have to sit through a class without texting) We want our information. We want it quick and we want it sooner rather than later.

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  42. Extensive Internet/media/technology use changes the way I think for many reasons. I think that the more technology comes out or is improved the less we all make use our brains. We don't necessarily have to think for ourselves anymore because all around us there are things that do it for us. Technology not only affects the amount of thinking that I do but also the concentration level I have when trying to complete school work or other things of importance. I always get on the computer thinking , "Okay, I'm going to complete my homework within an hour and be able to go to bed." Guess what? Doesn't happen, ever. I always get distracted with Facebook or other interesting websites that have nothing to do with my homework.I think that it's not only the internet but all technology in general that becomes a waste of my time because I don't use the tools to learn and when I do, it's only to get a quick answer on something, never to spend time actually learning something in depth. Older people who did their learning before smart phones and 2.0 existed are full of knowledge that I have at my fingertips and don't bother trying to learn about it. I have talked to elders and even the way they speak sounds smarter than today's generation. They actually had to use their brains to their full capacity to learn things back in time because no computer or phone was there to do the thinking for them. People who don't use the technology there is today and actually care about the amount of knowledge they have and an education read a lot and have their time and priorities set in order and actually follow through because they don't put their focus on technology. I read an article titled, "Leadership by the New Generation" and it was interesting to see what leaders that are going through retirement are worried about. They say that today's generation is basically lazy and always looking for more "me time". "They want flexible hours, more vacation time, continuous training, and telecommuting options. They expect to leverage technology to work efficiently instead of staying late in the office to get it all done.", this is what article says today's generation's mind is on constantly and I completely agree because I've heard people around my age or mid 20's complain about work and hardships in life when in reality what they go through is not much but they are so used to the easy life that when something "hard" comes up in life, they freak out and complain. Ttechnology may be used for good by some but for the majority of today's generation it is used for entertainment and wasting time.

    Article URL: http://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/newLDR_59.htm

    -Marie Alvarado
    Per.3

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  43. Extensive Internet/media/technology use to me is that it is the most convenient thing to use to look up something. When it comes to remembering the information that I look up I don’t remember it unless I purposely try to. There is no reason to remember it because if I do forget it, it takes me about a minute to find out whatever it was again. Knowing that the internet is always going to be there, and that it is almost always easily accessible, there is no need to force myself to remember things. Concentrating on what I need to do is more difficult on the internet than if I was using an encyclopedia. When you using an encyclopedia there are no potential distractions, unlike on the internet. I think people who learned without any access to the internet, would have worked harder at remembering what it was they looked up, because it was not as easy to look and find something.

    Mitchell Edmondson, P4

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  44. Internet use of media and other technological advances have changed my thinking tremendously in many different ways. I rely heavily on the internet for everything including social media, homework, and entertainment. Does this mean it has changed my thinking? I think so. The fact that a computer generates a lot of thinking for me makes thinking about thinking, well, difficult.
    I feel as if Google and other search engines have taken over our thinking in a sense. This idea of "the filter bubble" is a prime example of this. As well as filtering our information google has also led it to be easier to not really research on our own, but to rely on "keywords" and "specific examples" to research itself. This has influenced my thinking, in part, by making my mind a little more lazy than generations before. Smart phones were non-existent "back in the day" and a lot of people had to physically open a book to get the information they needed to acquire. This is what makes this new generation so different, our thoughts and dependencies all rely on the use of the internet.
    Social media on the internet also has a huge impact on my thinking and i'm sure it does to many others as well. Sites such as Facebook and Twitter and even blog sites are constantly influencing our thought process. When we read everyone else's thoughts, online, our thoughts begin to consist of their thoughts, so it makes the idea of thinking about our own thoughts very difficult. This is not to be confuse with the idea that people are solely influenced by the internet, although by the way that teenagers use the internet these days what they say and do, is clearly affected, in a small part, by social media.
    The internet not only influences the minds of this generation it also occupies a lot of our time, sometimes it takes away from time in which we should be focussing on more important things. I know from personal experience that Facebook takes me away from my homework all the time and it gets me to thinking is really worth it? Social media takes away from my priorities and I honestly feel that it affects my thinking in a negative way as well. Although Facebook, Twitter and all the other social sites do connect many friends, in the end the time we use dwelling over other peoples problems could be used to think about solutions to our own issues.
    The internet has so many advances that we should all be very thankful for in our time, but we truly don't know if it's for the best. In the past ten years technology has been outrageous, in sense that the social world is magnificent. Everyone enjoys the internet and really who in the right mind wouldn't? Unless they really looked into what is going on. I'm not saying the internet is taking over the world, but I am saying it has a large impact on all of our minds and whether its a good or bad impact is really for you to decide.

    Shannon Murray
    Period 3

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  45. Extensive Internet/media/technology use changes the way I think by keeping me hungry for more knowledge and information. Normally, at school I’m so eager to just learn what I need to know for the test and that’s it; all of the extraneous stuff I rule out. However, when I read about information on the Internet I do more elaborate studying because I am simply curious and it’s not forced learning. I concentrate better when learning from the Internet than I do sitting in a classroom. According to http://www.teachphilosophy101.org/Default.aspx?tabid=70 the Y Generation which is the generation of kids in today’s society are: more skeptical of authority, more narcissistic, spend less time on homework compared to previous generations and students from other countries, expect rewards to be distributed to all rather than to those who have merited recognition for their accomplishments, and have consumerist attitudes, expect others to cater to them rather than vice versa.

    Kayla McCallie
    Period 2

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  46. Technology has made me lazier.Look up an answer is much easier than thinking.It is hard to imagine a library is the best place to do research. Technology allows us to get more information than we can remember. The SAT questions that are send to peoples emails are awesome, but few people take advantage of them them. The internet is filled with distractions like Facebook and YouTube. It is almost impossible for me to not check my Facebook and Email when I use my computer. Its extremely hard to stay focus. I get on my computer to do one thing and end up doing 5 other things. There to much information out there not to get distracted.

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  47. The extensive use of Internet, media, and/or technology is awing depending on the eye of the beholder. As long as people don't abuse it, then there should be no problem using it. People should be glad that we have all this information within just clicks away from us. And I truly think its amazing that if I want to learn how to play the harmonica that I can find video's explaining how to step by step in just a matter of seconds. In oppose to signing up for lessons that I have to pay 30 bucks for. I personally can think just fine while using the internet and most of the time when I am looking up a subject it gives me new ideas to think about and those new ideas eventually lead me to look up more.
    I think its funny how people keep saying things were so much better in the past in terms of technology affecting our way of life, because if you continue to look back in the past then the present will pass you up and you will soon be lost in between what should be and what is. What I mean by this is, you have to learn to co-exist because we are only moving forward.

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  48. The Internet, and technology in general have really changed how people learn and think today. When my parents were in school, and they wanted to find out more information on a topic, they didn't have Google at their fingertips. They had to go and find some sort of reading material on the subject, and look it up "the long way." Now, when I have a question about something, one of two thoughts come to my head: Either, "I'm going to Google this when I get the chance," or, "I'm going to ChaCha this on my phone, because I'm to lazy to get online and look for myself." We have so much information that is, "just a click away." But now I'm learning of new walls that I need to overcome... such things as algorithims and filter bubbles, and this kind of stops my love for the Internet, or at least makes me question it. When I think of people talking about the Internet, I think of the phrase "broadening our minds to all the information that's out there." That's all that people would talk about when the Internet first came to be. And now all to come and find out that we don't have ALL of the information... just what our math equation supplies us with. I enjoyed a quote from Google Co-Founder Sergey Brin said in the article: "Right now you go into your computer and type a phrase, but you can imagine that it could be easier in the future, that you can have just devices you talk into, or you can have computers that pay attention to what's going on around them and suggest useful information." But is all this advancement in Google's effiency taking away some of the potential that the Internet has?

    Jessica C. P4

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  49. I think that extensive internet/technology use has lessened our ability to think. The need to be innovative and figure things out for ourselves has been replaced by searching a "how to..." site that tells us exactly what we need. There is definitely a fulfillment in discovering or solving something for ourselves and at the click of a button it has become rather rare.
    I remember when I was 12 and I had no cell phone, laptop, gamecube or tv of my own and my memories from that time were the happiest of my life. I would spend almost all day outside creating identities, worlds, building tree houses, hiding in fields, running through vineyards it was amazing. I feel like at that time I discovered more for myself than all the facts I've gathered from browsing the web.
    It seems at this point in time where all this information on history, languages, art, places etc. is available the hunger to learn and search for knowledge has been lost. Men and woman in the past dedicated their lives to the solving of problems and questions that drove them to greatness in their insatiable craving for truth, now with all this opportunity at our finger tips we do nothing even fractionally as important with it.
    We should be at the height of human intelligence rather than communication through technology. That is not to say that people today do not possess extreme intelligence, I simply feel that communication and our personal "digital print" has become the priority. Its like the internet has gone from being this unending source of information, to the morning news and chat site everyone uses.

    Cambria Leach P. 2

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  50. I think a better word to describe the use of technology in our research process would be efficient, rather than lazy which I've been seeing on a lot of people posts. There's no sufficient reason to do something the hard way when the easy way is sitting on your desk. Why would I push my car when I can drive it? I fail to see the issue with instantaneous gratification, it's simply more efficient than having to open an encyclopedia or worse, walk my booty over to library up hill in the snow, which is the common experience most curmudgeons bitch about, in order to access one. This brings up point however that I couldn't imagine a time in which I can't imagine a time in which I didn't have a cornucopia of information sitting in front of me, but in the end, what does it matter? I do have it and I don't see it leaving anytime soon. Trenton P.2

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  51. The use of technology doesn't (at least to me) seem like a potentially dangerous thing, to people who know how to keep it under control. When the use of the internet for information or for any other source of knowledge removes you from experiencing the truth or gathering ideas of your own, you're doing it wrong. At the end of the day, most of everything everywhere on the internet is the OPINION of someone. Even if it claims to not be biased, it still has some sort of personal, skewed filter that is preventing the light of the truth to shine in fully. I personally don't think that it (technology) influences my thinking all too much. I tend to not make huge decisions in my life based on what is being fed out by the social media and technological innovations alike, I'd rather trust my opinion than some random person's out in Wisconsin. My style of thinking hasn't changed, unless its changed for the better. I now know tons of useless and obscure facts that I would have never learned in real life (thank you, CRACKED). Technology isn't bad, it doesn't make people less intelligent, nor does it take away from learning. It definitely CAN, but people who sub come to that just found a new way to do so, blaming technology for people being lazy is a cheap excuse for a problem that has been around for years. Technology is relatively new and due to xenophobic ideologies, its an easy scapegoat to target.

    -Noe Bernal periodo 2

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  52. With such a technology forward generation, internet/media/technology use is becoming the immediate response to anything really. When we don’t know something, we turn to the internet. When we need to communicate with someone it’s usually through our cell phones or a social media website (i.e. Facebook). This changes the way I use my resources. I can find almost about everything through the power of the internet. There are so many different sources that you can find information from, what you have to watch out for is whether or not it is factual. In this time in age, the typically person wants to get things done as efficiently as possible. Why search for hours in a library when you can just search it on Google? This saves you a trip to the library and the “hassling” task of finding the intended book. Like many other teenagers in this era, I would find it disruptive to be without technology. It’s not a necessity, but it definitely is a comfort that I am grateful for. My parents are always going on about how so much easier things are with the advanced tools we have now a days; I can’t imagine what is going to be consider “up to date” when I have kids. We live in the age of technology, and while it has changed our society, we must take it in stride.

    Laura Wong
    2 Period

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  53. I have nothing to compare these things to, considering my own experience has always been with technology. Memory doesn't really pose problems for me. Concentration is definitely a big one. It's frustrating to know that my short attention span is due to technology, and the only time I can really focus for hours is by using technology or drifting off into my own head. It's difficult to make even subtle changes in technology use, but that is probably because I have such a routine way of doing things. I wonder if technology is any cause behind people getting so stuck in routines, trapped even. I hate it, but I'm extremely aware of time and whenever I think of time I have to know what time it is. I'm also really paranoid about my priorities having meaning, I'm really anxious about wasting my life away. Yet, if technology helps give these types of feelings, I always find myself spending my time playing video games or mindlessly clicking through the Internet. Maybe that's why I have those feelings in the first place, because my time is spent on things I'm told are not valued and worthwhile, yet they're addicting and keep me in a state of entertainment. I'm interested in what I spend my time doing, which has to do with the written word, film, and helping and understanding people. I know the media is what influenced me to get into film, but reading came before I was too conscious of the media and interest in people seems like a natural thing to me. I definitely believe a lot in the quote by Jim Morrison: "Whoever controls the media, controls the mind." Everything down to the way I go about my goals and the way I think was taught to me. It's strange to think how little of my own person I really am.

    Dannielle Edwards, 4th.

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  54. I believe that the extensive use of technology has changed my thinking in a positive manner. Because it is much easier to research something, I want to learn more because it is much faster to do so. I admit that there are plenty of distractions when using the internet but I think that with time it will be easier for us to control ourselves from being distracted. It will only take time and practice to keep ourselves from getting distracted. If we set priorities of whatever it is that we want to accomplish, it is more difficult to get distracted. I do this and it works for me. However, there are times when I do get distracted and start looking up random stuff on the web. Even then I think it's a somewhat positive thing to get distracted. I am still learning, it may not be what I am supposed to be focusing on at the moment but it's still valid. Learning knew information has been made easier/faster but I don't necessarily think that easier/faster means that we are getting lazier.It just means that we are getting the ability to accomplish more in a less amount of time. Not only that, but to access more information in general. Before smart phones and 2.0 existed, learning and doing research was perhaps a more tedious task because it required more effort and time. Now it's much easier to do this, so I think that it motivates others to strive to learn more rather then make them lazy. It only makes information more available to us. It can turn into something that may potentially make us lazy but as long as we have control, technology can only contribute to our learning in a positive manner.

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  55. It seems like the extensive internet/media/technology use is basically helping us become lazier. It is replacing our thoughts with computers that can think for you. However, it also makes it a lot easier to obtain information that I would have otherwise been too lazy to figure out. By the click of a button I can have my questions answered. It makes learning more appealing because it is simpler. I have also noticed that I become impatient when the computer is going slow. It annoys me and I feel like I'm just waisting time. In reality when you think about it.. waiting a little longer for the internet is still so much faster than going to the library and looking something up. It is hard to stay concentrated on subjects that don't interest me. I get bored very easily. I actually like thinking and analyzing things, and I feel like the internet makes it a lot easier to access useful information. According to http://lang-8.com/31381/journals/90875 the social issues in our society at that time have a great affect on the generation. It said that we are a more open-minded and clever generation, but it also says how we have an easier way of life and are given more facilities than previous generations got. Because of this it is said that we are less likely to value and enjoy the simple things in life. Which I think is true to a point.

    Nicole Anderson
    Period 2

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  56. Technology's advancements over the years have evolved rapidly and only made "positive" changes to our society, or so it's often thought. Personally, I believe that having developed such a large amount of power to devices that we aren't experts with, is a scary concept to grasp. When I sit to try and start my homework I go off into the world of wonders that the internet provides for me and lose all my train of thought. It's somewhat mind-boggling how anyone can achieve any work while using technology. Although, it certainly does provide an easier strategy for us to make any progress, considering we can subtract any type of serious thought process that we would regularly need. It has gotten to such an extreme point that at times i'll sit in front of the screen hoping that my homework would do itself and that way I could be all the more lazy. It's not healthy for students, or anyone at that, to be leaving all the "hard" work for the computer, cellphone, etc. to do for them. Our brains are being cooped up because some people decide to use theirs a little too much and invent new stuff.
    I think that our society isn't ready or responsible enough to handle all that's heading our way. If it were to continue on the path that we've been on, technology may form itself into the most powerful form of life. It's frightening to think that once we give them the power to do the thinking for us we're going to end up in a black pit of shame and failure.

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  57. I agree with what Page said about Google becoming part of our way of thinking. I can clearly see it being a part of mine. When I am curious about a topic I immediately check Google and see what comes up. If I really get interested I will dig more and even go to the library to get some books. However, it never starts with books for me. Unlike my parents.

    My dad likes to bring up when I use google and the rest of the internet to do reports and research papers how he used encyclopedias and had to go find books at school and the public library. I can also tell Google and internet search is not a part of my parents thinking because my mom is always buying books to find new cooking and baking recipes, and I tell her that she can just Google something and find tons of free recipes and even videos of the preparation. It is almost like I am coaching her.

    Regarding memory, I don’t think that the convenience has much of an affect on my memory. I remember quite a lot of what I look up via internet search. I even remember, most of the time, the terms I used to find the site I thought was really good.

    Some one might argue that approaching the internet for information can actually distract you from what you are seeking. How unlike a book. However, it is all information, only the device in which you extract that information is different. And if one is truly driven to find the information they seek, they will not get distracted. On the internet one can get thrown off by adds or a site with a funny name. With a text, the person next to you on the bus looks absurd and distracts you from the pages. It is all the same, just in different forms and thus the level of distraction there is from attaining the information is dependent upon the individual’s ability to concentrate.

    Time and priorities: just recently I have noticed myself, not getting distracted from what I am looking for on the internet, but getting distracted from school work because, with acquiring a personal laptop, I now have easy access to internet search and can quickly and effortlessly chase my impulsive mental inquiries. I’m doing my homework with half my brain. The other half is thinking about that oddly phrased movement in that Rachmaninoff Sonata and I immediately hit a good idea about it and I have to bring up the internet and listen to see if what I thought holds true. With the ease of my laptop and the frictionless aspect of todays Google and Youtube searches easily pulls me away from my priority; school work. In this way I see this disrupting priorities in real space. Oppositely, though, in cyberspace I seem to be pretty on top of my priorities in what I am looking for or doing.

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  58. The extensive use of internet/media/technology can be a distracting for most people, when used for research. The internet should not be used as a scapegoat for the reason why society has become lazy and distracted. It can be used as an amazing tool and provide efficiency for all of its users, if utilized wisely. In the words of Spiderman, "With great power comes great responsibility." The internet is the source of this "great power." We must use it responsibly and avoid the many distractions it offers. I used to lose my initial ambition for research because of Facebook, Youtube, and the many other recreational websites the internet has to offer. Now I can prioritize and ignore everything but my research. The extensive use of Internet/media/technology actually increases concentration and self-discipline. By Over-coming these obstacles of distracting websites, our minds get stronger and more efficient. Therefore the internet not only provides a more efficient research experience, it assists in establishing a culture of concentration and efficiency to its users.

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  59. I do not believe that extensive use of technology makes a person lazier. It is not a matter of interest as much as it is a convenience. For example, it would be a waste of precious time to look up a word in a dictionary or encyclopedia when you can search the internet for the same thing and get the needed information needed. Therefore if you do happen to be in the situation when your only source is a dictionary or encyclopedia, you will be dreading every second of it because in your mind you know that this could be done so much faster online. Thus completely disassembles our concentration. If the resources that are given to you are used correctly and efficiently, then success is what is to come. The problem that arouses is when people get distracted while using the internet by going on other sites. This would not be the case if this same person was reading in a book to retain information at the library. The role of technology is refine information to make it more easier and convenient to find exactly what your looking for. Information found on the internet may not always be valid or detailed, but it is very easy and quick to obtain. We can now use our phones to access the internet as well, which pretty much eliminates us from searching through hundreds of books at the library. The fact that there are many site where people can give their own opinions and information on certain articles is a big negative. These articles are very easy to access, and sometimes it is hard to know what is valid and what is not. This also holds you back from gathering your own information and creating an opinion of your own. The internet does supply an environment where thinking is not really necessary, but it also creates an opportunity to gather numerous sources of ideas, opinions, facts, and information with the click of a button.

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  60. Internet/media/ technology already have me thinking what the future holds for us. There is a vast expansion of technology already. A new thing is being thought up everyday. Without technology I feel I wouldn’t know as much as I do now. Media and internet keeps us informed of things happening around us, where we are able to get information quicker. When I think of older generation and how they obtain information I think of how little they new in a timely manner. They didn’t have the ability to just use a computer and find any information they wanted by a press of a key. For them they probably had to get information from a book. I see how technology has evolved immensely. It makes you wonder how we would be if we didn’t have a computer, phone, or TV. We would get most information from printed material. Hear of events from newspapers or simply by others. I believe the older generation probably socialized more than we do. We simple just send messages to one another. When back then if they wanted to talk to a friend they would go to one’s house.

    There are many positive but there are some negative in having our society rapidly progressing. A major negative would be people will only become lazier. In the future, I have no doubt, they will probably make a computer where you don't even need to type and you simple tell the computer what to look up and it does it. They already have the iphone where you can speak into it and it will translate it in text message format. Now wait until they put the same idea into every technology such as: computer and television.

    I found a couple different sites, which named each generation and gave description of each one and how they differ from one another.

    http://www.aect.org/edtech/edition3/ER5849x_C025.fm.pdf

    http://biznik.com/members/leslie-lyon/articles/thinking-in-generational-differences

    Stephanie Owens Per.4

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  61. I've found that extensive use of internet, media and technology have made me lazy and distracted. Not only am I distracted by text messages and facebook, but also music. I have Itunes running at all times and tend to put on music which is very distracting. I zone out very easily. For example when I'm doing homework and I cannot find the answer I'll look on google instead of figuring out to do it. Technology has not only distracted the world but it has also made it lazy.
    Chad foster
    Per.2

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  62. I've found that education is different for me than for generations of the past. Information comes easily, and without the effort that people of the past went through to learn. Learning is not just reading and writing now. It isn't basic math. Learning and thinking has become more critical. What do we want to learn? In today's world we have every resource available to us. Whether we use those resources for good, or for other more destructive purposes is entirely us to us. People can either go with the flow of information fed to them, or go beyond the relm of known facts to something worth knowing, that not everyone accepts as fact. Today, I have less of a problem challenging the facts given to me. I accept what I'm told, and don't go beyond the relms of convience. My thinking is something that hasn't gotten lazy. My ideas are still my own. I know what I think, I may not challenge it because of laziness, but I know what is right, I know what I should do still, I can thinik for myself, I have my good ideas. I may be lazier, but I know how to think for myself.

    Rachel Bumstead
    peiod 4

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  63. In most cases, technology has made me quite distracted, but nothing distracts me more than not being able to focus when I would like to. Which is odd for the fact that I don't do much anyway! Well, when being distracted, I don't do much. I just sit there, so I suppose it has made me lazy to some degree. Ah, yes. The media portion. Everyone I know will tend to get distracted when listening to music, but I beg to differ. I don't get distracted by the music, but it will help me concentrate even more. Keeping the awkward silence at bay, it's nice to have playing since it is my field. It is my life. Not to sound selfish about it, but I cannot stand the silence of anything. Maybe at times, but with iTunes playing, I'm pretty much sane. The media doesn't change how I think. As much of a tech-guy I am, none of this stuff poke around in my thoughts. It'll make us taking shorter routes, but it is time saving to have around. What I would like is that we all slow down. That's one thing I would like to do. My thoughts are my thoughts. Nothing technological with this generation can tell me what to think.

    I can consider myself as a lost puppy, but I stand my own.

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  64. The effect on me is more negative than positive, somewhat a bittersweet situation. Yes, of course I'm 'learning' more information at a faster and more convinient pace; I'm also not getting the full experience of learning through original schooling and books which I prefer a lot more. It's almost as if I feel like this technology hype is making me lazy, therefore making me not want to learn as much as I can just because of how easy and convinient it is. I find myself often relying on Google to find any answer that I need, when I could figure it out on my own. Even with this blog site, I could easily copy someone else's response, change up some words here and there and call it my own rather than actually putting in the time and work to get my own personal response. When I think about how my life was more organized and determined before I became caught up on the techonogly advancements, I realize how much better it was. Now, I am ALWAYS on my phone and Ipod. Anything I do, whether it's homework or in between my breaks during cheer practice, they are always with me and distract me completely. Though the information is at an easier grasp, I never learn it fully. I acknowledge it remember it for the time being, but I know for a fact that if someone were to ask me about it a couple days later, I won't remember that well because I didn't struggle to find the information. Personally, I use these tools of techonogly a lot, but I wish that when I was growing up, I wasn't so open to them. By that, I'm comparing my childhood of computers being around to use to my grandpa(who doesn't know how to really use a computer that well and his cell phone is brick-like) because he grew up with books and finding everything out for the most part by himself since he got taken out of school during the third or fourth grade, yet he is the smartest person I know. I like to think that if I were to grow up in the time period like his, I would be much more knowledgable. But with that being said, I do know how to think for myself, and I have many good thoughts and ideas that are my own and I will never let technogoly take that away from me.

    Adriana Zamudio
    Fourth Period

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  65. The internet is an excellent source of information. I frequently go on to find useful information when I'm either bored or need to know something for homework because of its usual efficiency. But, if I didn't have internet I wouldn't read an informative book on random events and I wouldn't spend the necessary time to figure out some of my homework and this would have affected the way I perform. Although I can get distracted on the internet, the internet shouldn't be the blame for why people waste their time because if the internet didn't exist those people, including me, would just find different things to waste their time with than internet sites like Facebook.

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  66. I think that technology has improved the way I think. I remember having to use books for research papers as a little kid and, though, the library is well organized, it is tough to find a book for the exact information your trying to find. Sometimes this information is impossible to find in the book. I think if you can use the internet correctly then you will be able to learn what you would like to know a lot faster than trying to look for it in a book

    Paul Hurd

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  67. The internet is one of my main sources of education and entertainment. This alone tells you that who I am today is heavily influenced by what I read and see on tbe internet. (Cracked and youtube) I wasn't always someone who would research numerous topics to gain knowledge purely for my self-being, but internet access made this possible. I now find myself analyzing things in everyday life more than necessary because I developed this state of mind. For example, simple things like how people present themselves or speak will spark countless thoughts. I believe the internet has benefitted not only my education, but who I am , as well.

    Alex McKinney
    Period 6

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  68. I believe that extensive internet/media/technology use has not changed the way I think very much, but has perhaps made it lazier and has definitely influenced the way i think. The reason for the laziness is that with sources such as the internet, I am able to find whatever it may be that I must find out rather quickly and easy as well. As for the influence, with the internet, I am able to learn about an infinite number of subjects which may spark my interest or broaden my intellectual horizons at my own leisure. Although technology creates an abysmal amount of distractions, if used properly and with a goal or focus in mind, can greatly improve one's thinking

    Salvador Ramos
    Period 2

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  69. Even though the internet/media/ technology has widen the barrier for how much information you can acquire. I think it has made actually think less. Because now, when we are faced with a problem, we don't use any problem solving techniques, we just type the question in Google and expect to find the answer in seconds. I think it has slowly made me think less and more impatient when concentrating on a subject. When I was younger and faced with a problem, I had to actually ask around and use many resources to find answers, which me patient and helped me focus. But now, in a matter of minutes I can find anything in world. So yes, technology has made everything for me to find. But it also took away all my thinking skills.
    Nicole Montoya
    period 3

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  70. The extensive Internet/media/technology use makes me feel lazier compared to my earlier habits. When I hear about something that "puzzles the will" and interests me I go to Google or Bing and type it in the search engine. That way I feel as if I am learning all that I can about it and I then move on. This creates the problematic event of not actually taking in the information that I am reading. The reason most people do this is because they can easily look back on the computer and read it again.
    Because of this I feel that I am not challenging myself. I do not know what capacities I can reach because I take advantage of the tools that are provided for me.
    Because of this I can tell that I do not rely on hardcover books for a lot of my research. These articles have helped me realize my subtle change in the way I research subjects.
    Learning about filter bubbles makes me feel shocked that I am yet again not seeing or being able to use all the information I could. This is somewhat a crutch because we are not able to move forward. Part of learning is being able to know all sides of every story. With this crutch we are not allowed that privilege.
    With this knowledge I realize that I could go back to books if need be. I need to alter the way I research in order to get all of the information I need.

    (Absent)
    Lizzie Level
    P.2

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  71. Extensive Internet/media/technology use makes me feel too reliant on technology rather than my own knowledge. Rather than coming up with my own consensuses on questions that arise, I just type the question into a popular search engine, and expect the right answer to pop out. In doing this I am actually hindering myself from learning all that I can. I usually just go with the first thing that pops up on the page instead of actually doing research. The extensive use of these technologies has only made me lazier in the pursuit of knowledge. Everything feels like it is just a click away. I need to realize that technology doesn't have a brain, no matter how much I would like it to. I need to use my own brain and solve problems and ask questions instead of relying on the technologies we have.
    Kelli Carrillo p.3

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  72. The use of media, internet, & technology has made my life much easier than say how it was hwne my parents grew up. When a teacher says write a research paper I don't head to the library, I head for the computer at my desk. All I have to do is google my question, read a few lines on a screen, and get my answer or a link to it. If something looks good all I do is lick on a few sites to get all the info I could ever possibly need. When comparing myself to older people, for example my parents, I don't think I know more because they both use the computer for some of their work and are very knowlegable on how to use its resources. Once we learn how to not letr filter bubbles take control, technology can continue to be a massive tool. Learning about duckduckgo.com, boolify.org, and dogpile.com are great sources to learn to get away from filter bubbles and algorithms. I will continue to improve my ways of using the internet by being in this class.

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  73. The use of internet, media, technology has made my life much easier. All I have to do is google something and I'll find my answer in a few minutes without rifling through a book for an hour. I have a question, type it into google, read the links, click on one or a few that look good, scan the sight, and then get all the info I could ever possibly want. When someone assigns me a research paper I don't head for the library I log onto the computer. Comparing myself to older people, I'm not as knowledgable about internet and how to use it as say my parents. They both use the computer every day for work and rely on it so they know way more than me. Once we learn to control filter bubbles, the internet will continue to be a massive tool. Learning about duckduckgo.com, boolify.org, and dogpile.com are good sources to get away from filter bubbles and algorithms. If I continue to pay attention, I will learn a lot about the internet in this class.

    Jojo Relyea
    Per. 3

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  74. The extensive Internet/media/technology use makes me think in a way in which efficiency and time is the most important. Suddenly it's not about the quality of the information it's about how fast can I get there and less about how much does it relate to what I'm searching.


    My ability to concentrate has diminished in the way where lots of trivial things get me more interested in some of the more substance driven ideas.


    I think the difference between older generations and my current one is that they had to work for it a bit more, I can get tons of information on just about anything with the click of my mouse while they had to go through books and research the hard way. Maybe in a way they learn more because they have to work for it.


    But then again, if we didn't have all this media, we wouldn't be as connected as we are today and I can recite tons of sites in which we have people helping other countries and sending them money and it's a lot quicker and easier. There's two sides to every story. The internet may in a way hurt us, but it also does a hell of a lot of good for us as well.


    I mean, even Obama's got a Tumblr now: http://barackobama.tumblr.com/.
    And we can send feedback to him. The internet is allowing the public to finally voice their opinion, and while that can be a very bad thing sometimes, when used by the wrong kind of people, it also can change the world.

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  75. Extensive media and technology has numbed and stupified our minds and stricken us all with extreme lethargy. I won't say that these tools have no positives, because they do. They have made searches and learning new things a lot easier and faster however they've made us all a lot lazier and for me they are more often than not a tremendous distraction. They've also made me more apt to search for an easier way out when I'm looking for something or at a problem.
    Tyler Stewart period 3

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  76. The last chance to make up all of our missing blog assignments??

    Learning about the Internet and technology and web 2.o, and such, has forced me to begin to think about how my thinking processes have been affected. Upon reflection, I have realized that I�ve (automatically) become lazier, for lack of a better word, and increasingly less able to maintain a high level of concentration and/or focus. I am constantly getting sidetracked; I find it hard to stay focused on one task at a time; I constantly feel the need to move on to something different; I want to move through things quicker. I can hardly sit down and read an academic text for longer than twenty minutes before I start checking how much is left, itching to skim through the remainder, move on, and just get someone else to fill me in on what I missed.
    I think that most of these consequences stem from the rapidity and brevity of information shared through technology. For example, if I want to research President Lincoln�s role in the Civil War all I would have to do is type �lincoln + civil war� into the search engine and out comes about 24,700,000 results in only .17 seconds. Simple enough. But if I wanted to do this very same research offline I would have to actually read through a number of texts and decipher the useful information for myself. Just twenty short years ago this was the norm. But now, with all of the advances made in technology and Internet sharing, offline research is perceived to be inefficient and, consequently, rendered obsolete.
    These values are definitely reflected in the tendencies I mentioned above. Why sift through (what feels like) mountains of information when everything that I need is just a click away? My frequent/prolonged use of technology has me convinced that the internet is a much better and more effective resource than a reference/text book.

    Kari Griego
    period 4

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  77. The use of all the new technology has made me think in a new perspective like maybe it is a good thing only if the people know how to control it but if people use it excessively it might end up affecting them negatively.

    Technology has given me an upper hand in education in the sense that if I don't know a word I am capable to look it up and come up with an answer in seconds unlike when using a dictionary, it can take up to two minutes just to find the definitions of a word. The new technology does not really affect my concentration since it doesn't really captivate my attention.

    The difference between previous generations and modern day generations is that people now a days depend on technology to teach them how to survive, how to think, how make it in life. They have no basic instinct and are dependent on technology for most of their problems. This is not true for all generations but it is for a couple of people. Now older generations relied on their instincts, their knowledge, their thoughts to help them survive in life when things came to a pause.

    There is a positive side to the new technology, but once again it depends if the audience know how to even out the usage of technology. It allows us to be informed about life outside our county and country. We are even informed about outer space. So I guess in a way technology is a step forward with society

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  78. The extensive use of the internet seems to dull the mind. The way we are headed soon literally EVERYTHING will be done online. As a world we are headed to extreme laziness. Not to say I don't fall under this category because I use the internet daily. Computers do most of your thinking for you and not nearly as much work is required compared to pre-internet times. Also with every media website just one click away its easy to become distracted. I don't want to imagine having to do some of the research that is assigned to me without the internet and I give kudos to the many, many who did it before me. I think elderly people who grew up without all the technology of today are stronger intellectually. I don't know where technology is heading because it's difficult to keep up anymore really, but it wouldn't surprise me if one day schools provided every student with a computer because they will be a requirement soon.

    Matthew Giddings p.3

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