Monday, May 14, 2012

May 14

JOURNAL TOPIC: [today's tunes: "Today (Watch Me Shine)" by Everlast; "Today" by Smashing Pumpkins]

What would the world look like if schools were products of their students instead of the other way around?

AGENDA:
1. Journal (get your head back in the game)
2. Presentations

HW:
1. Read this article and this article, then comment to this post with the following information:
a)Explain how you intend to get the information you need without ruining yourself financially; b)Explain how you and others can add value to a community and get rewarded in the marketplace WHILE you're going to school; and
c)Advise younger students about what they can/should do in order to lessen their anxiety and improve their chances for success.

26 comments:

  1. I have done a lot of research and have found out that scholarships are the best route to go. I have done many comunity serices throughout high school and have found it to be very rewarding and a great way to be involved and feel accomplished. While participating in community services it opens the door for many scholarship opportunities. I believe high school students should do a lot of research and be informed about the school they plan to attend and apply for many scholarships. Along with talking to other college students to see what they have done to be where they are financially.

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  2. Well, students can always go take online college courses or just not go to college after graduating high school. I've heard numerous stories about people saving up and then going back to school to get a higher degree. By the time that happens, some people are already married so their spouse can help them/each other out. For part b, I'm not actually sure how to tackle that question. I feel like students can participate in clubs and become an active member in a volunteer program or what ever. For C, I'll be brutally honest. No one really helped us with how to handle anxiety-- why should I advise them? Let them figure it out themselves through online researching. They should be smart enough, anyway.

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  3. I am planning to search out Cal Poly’s financial aid department and become friends with a lawyer (social networking) so I can navigate and negotiate the terms of my tuition. In addition I will consider the financial situation with my family and see if I can really get my brother and me to college without cruel and unusual burdens to my family as a whole. I am currently working with a professional and hopefully taking on the role as an apprentice in the field of communication technology to see if that is a marketable skill people are after. If not, I will also be working in the missions field, possibly with my pastor or other connections and see if I can pick up some skill sets there. However if all else fails and I cannot pay for even half of my college tuition by the fall before my third year in college, I will enlist into the armed forced as a chaplain and further pursue my education through the military giving me the Montgomery G.I bill guaranteeing at least an additional two years of college. I will not touch student loans. If I can’t pay for it and if my parents will be burdened by my brother and I going to college, I give my brother and parents the security of only having to pay for one kid to go through college. To the younger class men, I greatly encourage you to ask questions nonstop until you feel like you are no longer a pawn but a player in the game of higher education financing. The more you know and the more you learn, the more likely you will not be trapped or at least at the very least can walk into the lions den with no surprises lying in wait.

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  4. After learning more and more about the extremely high cost of a higher education, I began doing a lot more research. I found that scholarships and grants are the best answer. They aren’t easy to receive and you may not receive too much, but they are a lot of help and you aren’t required to pay them back. Another way can be by saving up my own cash. Besides spending the little extra cash I have on clothes or unnecessary things, I plan to start a little piggy bank like before. I believe that by volunteering and doing a lot of community service, you can open up many opportunities. Not only will it look good on your resume, but it will also get you noticed by business managers and adults. That can help a lot in the future with maybe a job or a reference. A little advice for younger students, start working on scholarships early and make sure to research what it is you want to do. With the way the economy is going, the career you might be chasing may not be around when your time comes. Also, make sure to have fun and enjoy life because it goes by at the blink of an eye.

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  5. How I intend on getting the education I need without ruining myself financially is going to community college first and then transferring to a university. I feel like it's the wiser decision because I can get all of my general ed. out of the way without paying big bucks. It also helps me become secure in what I want to major in. And if I want to, I can easily change it. While I'm going to school I plan on being a part of certain internships. And for advice for younger students who are thinking about making that leap into a 4 year and straight into debt, I would highly recommend them to think it over so they could be sure of what they are doing is right in their heart.

    Kira Asel Period 3

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  6. Well instead of going straight to a four year college I'm saving a ton of money by going to a junior college. While I'm going to junior college I will be living at home (saving money that way too) and working a job (earning money). By doing this I will also be able to take whatever classes I am interested in without feeling stressed out. I can take a dance class if I want!
    I suppose young adults can join clubs that interest them. That will help connect them with people which will come in handy later on down the road.
    Advice: SLOW IT DOWN. Don't assume that you'll be fine living away from home going to a four year right away. It's not only the debt that is going to hit you hard, don't forget about the ones you're leaving behind. It's emotionally draining. Make sure whatever you do is right FOR YOU, not what you think is expected of you.

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  7. For me, setting forth in a creative career I have a lot of opportunity to learn on my own. After all, my entire artistic foundation was built on teaching my self. In pursuing music, I do wish to have instructors because I value the relationship between student and master, however, a lot of what I need to learn can be self-taught. Also, in creative fields, most significant discovery is achieved by the self. Instructors teach skill, students become skilled. Having said all of this, I plan to study privately with instructors. Eventually I hope to study under valuable teachers and learn everything I wish to learn, outside of university. At some point, I would like to attend one though.

    It depends on what that person wants to do, but I know someone studying medicine can get internships that can help the community and help them get jobs in the future; helps them build connections. Also, having the internet and a "Flat World," quoting Thomas Friedman, we have unbelievable opportunity to act on our imaginations and to create jobs for ourselves while in school. If a medicine major really wanted to, they could give lessons online or something. There is some way I am sure to make money while in school, we have the technology...

    "Anyone can do anything and anything can and will be done."

    I advise younger students to really look into what it is they want to do and dig up all of the options they have for attaining the needed education. Find cheaper colleges, non-profit groups, etc. They are out there and even though they don't reward a degree, sometimes learning there and actually doing something and displaying it online is a better achievement than a degree.

    -Trevor Hudgins
    Period 6

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  8. Financially, scholarships are my way to go. There are SO many options out there scholarship-wise. If you are willing to go out there and search all the sites available, there is a scholarship or grant waiting there. You have to be able to take the time to fill out the application, but it's a simple way to get random money towards education that will never need to be paid back. It's also a good idea to keep up good grades while in high school because that, too, could earn you a merit scholarship or school grant for your high GPA. Even though getting a job in college seems difficult, it is a great way to earn a few extra funds while taking classes to pay for school. There are even some paid internships that can help give back to the community while earning a wage. I understand money is a big issue for going to college these days, but if going to university is what a student wants to do, they shouldn't let the expenses weigh down their options. Going to college opens a lot of doors and if you put yourself out there, you can get to the college of your dreams with a good financial backing. For the next year of prospective students: apply to the universities you wish to go attend in order to keep all options open. Apply to any scholarship you qualify for (and maybe some you just think you do...what's the harm in trying?). Sure, loans and debt are something nobody wants. But college, for me, is about the intellectual experience and the growth of my education, not just a dollar price.

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  9. Libraries are free, and so is their internet. Also, scholarships are very easy to find if one is willing to do the research. As for adding to the community while going to school, I already have plans to do that through music. My roommate is ready to start collaborating and recording as soon as I get there. We may never drop an album, and we really have no plans to, but music does make the world go 'round, as cheezy and cliche as that sounds. And I'd have to agree with Mari on the last bit. I might acually enjoy seeing someone else stress and sweat for a change. I will say that it isn't so bad if you get a head start and do your research. And that's all I really have to say about that.

    Marissa Tajalle
    P.2

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  10. The decision I made for myself midyear was to go to a community college and transfer rather than struggle and worry about how to come up with enough money. Honestly, making this decision was kind of a setback for me, as I was so eager to go straight to a four year and leave home, but it was also the most logical sense in my case. Also with this decision made, I felt a huge burden lifted as I have more time to save up money. In terms of saving, I’ll be attending a junior college while living at home or local, working, and applying for several scholarships and grants as well.
    My advice for younger students is to start early, don’t wait. From previous experiences, even though college seems so far away, it’s not, so don’t procrastinate it. I highly encourage those to start a college fund and start saving now. Also, start applying for scholarships. There are so many! And to those who already know what they want to do or have a general idea, look further into it, sometimes there’s schools or certain scholarships that offer aid/scholarships toward what you want to do specifically. And I’m not guaranteeing starting early will fully accomplish your goals. But it will help in the long run and ease the worrying and stress.

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  11. Scholarships are going to help me a lot. Going straight to a four year is expensive, but there are many scholarships out there. People, companies, businesses are giving out money, all we (students) have to do is look for them and apply for them. I do not know how many I have applied for already. Getting a job in college won't be easy, but it will help pay for things. The cost of college shouldn't stop a student from going to the school for the education. There is nothing wrong with going to a community college or junior college. Money is a big deal when going to college. Because it is such a big deal, students shouldn't waste time partying or having too much fun that their grades slip.
    My advice is that it is never too early to apply for a scholarship.

    Chelsey Soriano
    Period #3

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  12. Now that I have read these articles I have decided that the best way for me not to ruin myself financially is to not spend money with pointless stuff. I am going to have to cut back with a lot of the things I tend to buy, like going shopping all the time or even going out to eat as often. Also, for college I can save money by doing scholarships. There are so many opportunities out there that I just need to find and be willing to spend time on. We can add value to a community by simply volunteering. There are so many programs in communities that can use a helping hand. Most students have a lot of extra time on their hands and should be willing to help the community. Not only will the student be helping the community but themselves as well. They will get themselves known with people in the community who can later help them. Younger students should be involved as much as they can. This is one of the things that I regret not doing as much and which I know could have helped me a lot. They should try to do as many scholarships as possible; it’s never too early to begin, because it will help so much.

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  13. I planned on going to a Jr. college from the beginning, and so I am. That cuts costs down significantly. Living at home and working on minimum wage can get you through community school with money left over. This provides you with experience that benefits you in the long run. My advice: Don't get an education you can't afford, plan ahead, and start now.

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  14. I intend to get a good education by taking many internships and learning on my own. For example, my dad is an entrepreneur and because of his many jobs and experiences he has learned to do many things and has added to his skill set. To add to the example of my father, in graphic design and sports marketing, he is able to use his skill to benefit the global community because he interacts with people from Japan to Anaheim. While being in school, a student can get rewarded in the marketplace and community because people are more willing to offer students aid because they are fresh and young. At the same time, in contrast, students have a greater forgiveness of error on their part. Advice I would impart on younger students is to take advantage of all opportunities that offer a learning experience such as community service or internships. The more skills they acquire, the more confidence they will have of reaching success.

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  15. I can go to community college to lessen the cost of the first two years, and apply for scholarships so that the future years will also be less. I also won't take out loans that I know will be too much for me to handle, pay attention to interest% etc. I can add to the value of my community and get rewarded from the marketplace by using the time I have left in high school to invent something that everyone in the world will want. I'm not telling what though, it's my idea. Younger students should take time to do scholarships, etc to ensure they won't be in debt until they're senile, but that they should also should learn more about themselves and enjoy their time so that they arnt stressed out and miserable.

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  16. For most college students it seems like student loans are inevitable. However, in econ we are learing which schools would be a smart investment. If the job your planning on getting after you graduate doesn't pay a certain amount then your student loans wouldn't be worth it. Also it's really important to get a job while you're going to college. Even though it might be a challenge juggling work and school, the extra money will be helpful. My advise would be to apply for scholarships. There are soo many out there and people really want to give you money. Apply for as many as possible and that will definately help with expenses.

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  17. I think you need to have a job at least part time while in school, community or a four year. Every family is different and have various financial situations. Getting a job will help lower costs and stress on familes. Unfortunately I have been having a hard time getting scholarships but I will keep trying. I will definitely need a job next year!

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  18. I think I was too proud in my decision to rule out a junior college. Unfortunately I'm pretty commited at this point and I need to intensify my search for all that free money waiting to be found. In the mean time as much you'd like to devote yourself fully to your schooling and ambitions, a job is necessary. My advice to the younguns is to take advantage of any possible way to save your money

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  19. I think it's inevitable to have to take out student loans in some degree. However, I think that there are ways to be smart about it. I chose a school in a city I have yet to visit because their financial aid package was the best offered to me out of all of the schools I was accepted to. With local scholarships that I've won, I practically have my entire first year paid for. You may have to pass up an option you were hoping for for something a little different, but I think it's worth staying out of debt for. I plan on working part-time while in school, which is something that will further aid my financial situation. As far as advice, I would recommend scholarship searching as soon as possible, and completing as many as you are eligible for. It may seem really time consuming, but it's worth it in the long run.

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  20. A) Like students said in the previous comments, I plan on going to a community college first to save money. However, I have also been applying for as many scholarships as possible.
    B) While going to school, students can volunteer in their community, which allows them to give back to their community as well as get rewarded through scholarships.
    C) My advice for younger students would be to start on scholarships as soon as possible. I missed several scholarships in the beginning of the year because my focus was elsewhere. Also, stay open minded about choosing a college. Don't assume going straight to a four year or going to a community is the best answer, find out what suits you best.

    Period 2

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  21. College, first thought it comes across my mind is "How am I gonna survive with those enormous cost it takes?" As a student going to be at college in couple months, money is the big part of school life. In my case, I do not have working permit or anything that can get me a job, so I have to rely on my parents, for me, it is very hard and I really feel bad. Some adults say this many times "Education is FREE! Go have some!", well not anymore, looks at those students getting out from school with gigantic amount of student debt. I decided to go to Junior College and transfer and I hope that choice can somewhat save me from those debts. For those young kids who are going to college someday, find everything you can do (in job area) or save up your money, starting NOW. Now or Never.

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  22. My own little nagging voice always tells me ''For the love of GOD do not turn down free money!!!!'' Which is pretty sound advice when it comes to college. I know that most students are a little hesitant when it comes to owing people money but in the long run it could be worth it. (Depending on your field of choice) If after college you decide to pursue a field that pays really well then loans might not be a bad idea. Another piece of advice for me to you is get a job during college. They have jobs on campus at libraries, food stops, ticket stands, all kinds of stuff! Its a hoot! Also start saving money now as well. That coupled with scholarships can help lessen the load.

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  23. After reading this I feel like I need to get a job in college because as we all know college is very expensive. Unlike many people I want to get a job so I can at least help pay for my non-essential school items like clothes.

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  24. A) I plan to go to a community college first because it is ceaper and you save money by not having to pay for living expenses because you're staying home.
    B) Students can volunteer and give back to their community in many different ways. Also alot of volunteer work can usually score you some scholarships as well.
    C) For younger students, start saving money and get your parents to save their money. Apply to every single scholarship that you think you have a chance to win. Start early and dont though and opptions out the door, anything can happen. The best you can do is be ready.

    -Carson Dacus period 6

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  25. I am going to get a job in college and while I am going to a 4 year first I will be living at home to save money.
    I have volunteered a lot throughout the years and plan to keep doing that as well. It looks good on your application and scholarships.
    My advice would be to start saving now and encourage your family to save too. Apply to everything and "keep up your faith."

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  26. When it comes to education, MONEY is the biggest issue for both students and their parents. However, when Dr. Preston told the class that continuing higher education is also investing in our lives, it made me think a little differently. Students should decide wisely on which college they choose...for instance, they shouldn't judge a school by its name but by its offer. I volunteered at the Marian Hospital last year and this year and in return, I earned a scholarship from them. However much you put into effort, you get back in return. Advice for future students is to be aware of the costs of colleges and plan ahead by applying for scholarships and tutoring kids to save up money.

    Samuel Moon
    Period 6

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